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Title: Phytoremediation: using green plants to clean up contaminate soil, groundwater, and wastewater

Abstract

Phytoremediation, an emerging cleanup technology for contaminated soils, groundwater, and wastewater that is both low-tech and low-cost, is defined as the engineered use of green plants (including grasses, forbs, and woody species) to remove, contain, or render harmless such environmental contaminants as heavy metals, trace elements, organic compounds and radioactive compounds in soil or water. Our research includes a successful field demonstration of a plant bioreactor for processing the salty wastewater from petroleum wells; the demonstration is currently under way at a natural gas well site in Oklahoma, in cooperation with Devon Energy Corporation. A greenhouse experiment on zinc uptake in hybrid poplar (Populus sp.) was initiated in 1995. These experiments are being conducted to confirm and extend field data indicating high levels of zinc (4,200 ppm) in leaves of hybrid poplar growing as a cleanup system at a site with zinc contamination in the root zone of some of the trees. Analyses of soil water from experimental pots that had received several doses of zinc indicated that the zinc was totally sequestered by the plants in about 4 hours during a single pass through the root system. The data also showed concentrations of sequestered metal of >38,000 ppm Znmore » in the dry root tissue. These levels of sequestered zinc exceed the levels found in either roots or tops of many of the known ``hyperaccumulator`` species. Because the roots sequester most of the contaminant taken up in most plants, a major objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of root harvesting as a method to maximize the removal of contaminants from soils. Available techniques and equipment for harvesting plant roots, including young tree roots, are being evaluated and modified as necessary for use with phytoremediation plants.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
  2. Applied Natural Sciences, Inc., Hamilton, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
274159
Report Number(s):
ANL/ES/CP-89941; CONF-960804-38
ON: DE96012698
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPECTRUM `96: international conference on nuclear and hazardous waste management, Seattle, WA (United States), 18-23 Aug 1996; Other Information: PBD: [1996]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ZINC; ROOT ABSORPTION; SOILS; REMEDIAL ACTION; GROUND WATER; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; BIODEGRADATION; PLANTS; CONTAMINATION; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; METALS

Citation Formats

Negri, M.C., Hinchman, R.R., and Gatliff, E.G. Phytoremediation: using green plants to clean up contaminate soil, groundwater, and wastewater. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Negri, M.C., Hinchman, R.R., & Gatliff, E.G. Phytoremediation: using green plants to clean up contaminate soil, groundwater, and wastewater. United States.
Negri, M.C., Hinchman, R.R., and Gatliff, E.G. Mon . "Phytoremediation: using green plants to clean up contaminate soil, groundwater, and wastewater". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/274159.
@article{osti_274159,
title = {Phytoremediation: using green plants to clean up contaminate soil, groundwater, and wastewater},
author = {Negri, M.C. and Hinchman, R.R. and Gatliff, E.G.},
abstractNote = {Phytoremediation, an emerging cleanup technology for contaminated soils, groundwater, and wastewater that is both low-tech and low-cost, is defined as the engineered use of green plants (including grasses, forbs, and woody species) to remove, contain, or render harmless such environmental contaminants as heavy metals, trace elements, organic compounds and radioactive compounds in soil or water. Our research includes a successful field demonstration of a plant bioreactor for processing the salty wastewater from petroleum wells; the demonstration is currently under way at a natural gas well site in Oklahoma, in cooperation with Devon Energy Corporation. A greenhouse experiment on zinc uptake in hybrid poplar (Populus sp.) was initiated in 1995. These experiments are being conducted to confirm and extend field data indicating high levels of zinc (4,200 ppm) in leaves of hybrid poplar growing as a cleanup system at a site with zinc contamination in the root zone of some of the trees. Analyses of soil water from experimental pots that had received several doses of zinc indicated that the zinc was totally sequestered by the plants in about 4 hours during a single pass through the root system. The data also showed concentrations of sequestered metal of >38,000 ppm Zn in the dry root tissue. These levels of sequestered zinc exceed the levels found in either roots or tops of many of the known ``hyperaccumulator`` species. Because the roots sequester most of the contaminant taken up in most plants, a major objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of root harvesting as a method to maximize the removal of contaminants from soils. Available techniques and equipment for harvesting plant roots, including young tree roots, are being evaluated and modified as necessary for use with phytoremediation plants.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
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