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Title: Spills, drills, and accountability

Abstract

NRDC seeks preventive approaches to oil pollution on U.S. coasts. The recent oil spills in Spain and Scotland have highlighted a fact too easy to forget in a society that uses petroleum every minute of every day: oil is profoundly toxic. One tiny drop on a bald eagle`s egg has been known to kill the embryo inside. Every activity involving oil-drilling for it, piping it, shipping it-poses risks that must be taken with utmost caution. Moreover, oil production is highly polluting. It emits substantial air pollution, such as nitrogen oxides that can form smog and acid rain. The wells bring up great quantities of toxic waste: solids, liquids and sludges often contaminated by oil, toxic metals, or even radioactivity. This article examines the following topics focusing on oil pollution control and prevention in coastal regions of the USA: alternate energy sources and accountability of pollutor; ban on offshore drilling as exemplified by the energy policy act; tanker free zones; accurate damage evaluations. Policy of the National Resource Defence Council is articulated.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
272772
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Amicus Journal; Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Spr 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; OIL SPILLS; WATER POLLUTION ABATEMENT; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; LEGAL ASPECTS; COASTAL REGIONS; OFFSHORE DRILLING

Citation Formats

NONE. Spills, drills, and accountability. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
NONE. Spills, drills, and accountability. United States.
NONE. Fri . "Spills, drills, and accountability". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_272772,
title = {Spills, drills, and accountability},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {NRDC seeks preventive approaches to oil pollution on U.S. coasts. The recent oil spills in Spain and Scotland have highlighted a fact too easy to forget in a society that uses petroleum every minute of every day: oil is profoundly toxic. One tiny drop on a bald eagle`s egg has been known to kill the embryo inside. Every activity involving oil-drilling for it, piping it, shipping it-poses risks that must be taken with utmost caution. Moreover, oil production is highly polluting. It emits substantial air pollution, such as nitrogen oxides that can form smog and acid rain. The wells bring up great quantities of toxic waste: solids, liquids and sludges often contaminated by oil, toxic metals, or even radioactivity. This article examines the following topics focusing on oil pollution control and prevention in coastal regions of the USA: alternate energy sources and accountability of pollutor; ban on offshore drilling as exemplified by the energy policy act; tanker free zones; accurate damage evaluations. Policy of the National Resource Defence Council is articulated.},
doi = {},
journal = {Amicus Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1993},
month = {Fri Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1993}
}
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