skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Unusual chemical compounds in flue gas desulfurization systems

Abstract

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems continue to have deposits formed on internal surfaces of the materials of which the FGD systems are fabricated. These compounds contribute to crevice corrosion of the alloys of which some of the FGD systems are made. In the process of performing the failure analysis of the FGD fabrication materials, new compounds were discovered. This paper discusses two corrosion failure analysis case histories and the new compounds that were discovered and the chemical environment in which they were discovered.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
272009
Report Number(s):
CONF-960389-
TRN: IM9635%%436
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) annual corrosion conference and exposition: water and waste water industries, Denver, CO (United States), 24-29 Mar 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Corrosion/96 conference papers; PB: [6615] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; CORROSION; FAILURE MODE ANALYSIS; FLUE GAS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; CALCIUM SULFIDES; CORROSIVE EFFECTS; CALCIUM SULFATES; CEA-ADL DUAL ALKALI PROCESS; HYDRATES; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COAL; COMBUSTION; DRY SCRUBBERS; LIMESTONE

Citation Formats

Dille, E.R.. Unusual chemical compounds in flue gas desulfurization systems. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Dille, E.R.. Unusual chemical compounds in flue gas desulfurization systems. United States.
Dille, E.R.. 1996. "Unusual chemical compounds in flue gas desulfurization systems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_272009,
title = {Unusual chemical compounds in flue gas desulfurization systems},
author = {Dille, E.R.},
abstractNote = {Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems continue to have deposits formed on internal surfaces of the materials of which the FGD systems are fabricated. These compounds contribute to crevice corrosion of the alloys of which some of the FGD systems are made. In the process of performing the failure analysis of the FGD fabrication materials, new compounds were discovered. This paper discusses two corrosion failure analysis case histories and the new compounds that were discovered and the chemical environment in which they were discovered.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 8
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Boiler chemical cleaning wastes (BCCW) are generated by the periodic waterside cleaning of utility boilers to remove metallic deposits from boiler tube surfaces. Depending on boiler metallurgy, BCCW generally contain high concentrations of iron and copper or both, as well as other heavy metals such as chromium, lead, nickel, and zinc. BCCW treatment and disposal methods include precipitation, coponding in an ash pond, evaporation in the fireside of an operating boiler (for organic solvents), and contracted off-site disposal. Depending on the type of BCCW chemical treatment methods achieve varying degrees of success. BCCW which contain organic chelating agents can bemore » especially difficult to treat to national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) limits (1 mg/L for both iron and copper) with conventional lime precipitation.Research is being done to evaluate different BCCW treatment and disposal methods. One waste management option under consideration is reuse of BCCW in utility wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. To investigate this option, a series of laboratory tests were performed in which five different types of BCCW were added to the reaction tank of EPRI's bench-scale wet limestone FGD system. This paper presents the results and conclusions from this study.« less
  • In 1991, the Flue Gas Desulfurization Task Force, under the direction of the North American Electric Reliability Council's (NERC) Generating Availability Trend Evaluations (GATE) Working Group, released a report on the performance of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. This paper is an abridgement of the report that required two years of research and analysis by that task force. The overriding finding is that the performance of FGD systems has improved rapidly since the first FGD systems were installed. Many reasons were found to explain this improvement. Two primary reasons are that FGD technology matured through the cooperation of manufacturers andmore » utilities, and utilities gained experience and knowledge in the operation and maintenance of the FGD chemical cycle.« less
  • During the 9/16/77-12/31/78 demonstration test period, FGD outages occurred on 315 out of 472 days because of corrosion of the booster fan's air foil blades resulting from accumulated fly ash, water, and ice in the fan housing and on the blades; high silica levels in the boiler; corrosion of the guillotine isolation damper resulting from fly ash buildup; and fluctuating steam pressure and flow to the FGD plant due to wet, poor-quality coal. Other problems included leaks in the absorber tray; plugging of the evaporator circulating pump driver during interruptions in the main steam supply; and a lower than expectedmore » purge dryer operating capacity. The booster fan problems have been resolved by revisions and additions to the fan design. The installation of a continuous silica analyzer and other modifications have effectively controlled the boiler silica problems. The damper was modified and the seals replaced with ones made of a more corrosion-resistant alloy, but the fly ash buildup problem persists. Higher-quality coal is now used so that boiler operation is no longer erratic.« less
  • For the past five years there have been extensive efforts to develop a sodium-based double alkali process in which limestone, rather than lime, is used to regenerate the absorbent, thus retaining the advantages of using a solution as the absorbent liquid while avoiding the higher operating costs inherent with the use of lime. FMC Corporation, Combustion Equipment Associates, Inc. (now Thyssen-CEA Environmental Systems, Inc.--TESI), A.D. Little, Inc., Accurex Corporation, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have been active in the development of a limestone double alkali process. These efforts have advanced the technology of the process to the point thatmore » a commercially acceptable limestone double alkali process seems assured. Among the studies of limestone double alkali processes in the past few years, there has been an EPA-sponsored prototype scale evaluation at the Gulf Power Company's Scholz steam plant, an economic evaluation by the Tennessee Valley Authority, and an economic evaluation by the Stearns-Roger Engineering Corporation. This paper summarizes these three evaluations and discusses studies and test work by the FMC Corporation to develop a limestone double alkali process.« less
  • This paper explores some of the fundamental economic and technical evaluation factors that will lead to a determination of the recommended sulfur dioxide removal process and scrubber system supplier. The selection procedure discussed in this paper provides an outline of how to obtain the best endproduct, not only in terms of cost, but in areas of design, operation, maintenance, performance and reliability. 1 ref.