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Title: Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control

Abstract

In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ;
  1. Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
271984
Report Number(s):
CONF-960389-
TRN: IM9635%%411
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) annual corrosion conference and exposition: water and waste water industries, Denver, CO (United States), 24-29 Mar 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Corrosion/96 conference papers; PB: [6615] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; DISTILLATION EQUIPMENT; CORROSION; CORROSION PROTECTION; PETROLEUM REFINERIES; PETROLEUM FRACTIONS; DESALINATION; CARBON DIOXIDE; HYDROGEN SULFIDES; MIXING; SODIUM HYDROXIDES; PH VALUE; CORROSION INHIBITORS; WASHING

Citation Formats

Bagdasarian, A., Feather, J., Hull, B., Stephenson, R., and Strong, R. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Bagdasarian, A., Feather, J., Hull, B., Stephenson, R., & Strong, R. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control. United States.
Bagdasarian, A., Feather, J., Hull, B., Stephenson, R., and Strong, R. 1996. "Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_271984,
title = {Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control},
author = {Bagdasarian, A. and Feather, J. and Hull, B. and Stephenson, R. and Strong, R.},
abstractNote = {In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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  • This paper details the authors' experience in controlling crude unit overhead corrosion with filming and neutralizing inhibitors. This experience has been gained in units processing from 10 MBPD to 200 MBPD (1.59 MML/d to 31.8 MML/d) and over a wider range of operating conditions. Significant advances in corrosion control technology have resulted from this work. A better understanding of crude unit corrosion mechanisms now exists. More importantly, new tools and products have been developed to solve today's problems. High corrosion rates have been observed in several crude unit overhead applications with treatment programs utilizing traditional corrosion control chemistry. Various corrodentsmore » are responsible for this corrosion potential. In addition to HCl and H/sub 2/S, new corrodents have been identified in crude unit overhead condensates. These include several sulfur oxide compounds and various organic acids.« less
  • Failures of overhead equipment often occur at a much higher rate than probe measurements predict. This can be due to accelerated underdeposit pitting rates which are about twenty times the general rates. Underdeposit corrosion is primarily caused by iron sulfide deposits rather than neutralization salts as is commonly believed. The corrosion mechanism that leads to failures is the formation of a differential potential cell between the clean or lightly covered areas and the heavily deposited areas. Equations have been derived which show that the solubility of iron sulfide is dependent on pH and the concentration of sulfides present. These equationsmore » define the maximum pH at which a system can operate and remain free of iron sulfide deposits. Data are included which show that new generation inhibitors can control corrosion in the pH range necessary to prevent deposits. The goal of any program designed to minimize equipment failures should be to prevent the formation of deposits and the ensuring underdeposit pitting corrosion.« less
  • A corrosion control program was started at Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc.'s Wilmington, Calif., refinery in 1985 to determine corrosion problem areas in the distillation facilities, and to establish effective corrosion control procedures to improve the reliability of the distillation unit. A total control program approach was used. Corrosion mechanisms and variables affecting corrosion were first identified, and then recommendations for mechanical and operating modifications were given. The primary subject matter of the article is divided into the following areas: Crude slate; Overhead system; Crude-unit experience; Light ends fractionation; Corrosion mechanisms; Crude dewatering benefits; Chloride reduction; Amine application; Inhibitor feedmore » optimization; Acid/base balance.« less
  • Lummus Crest Inc. has developed a new low investment and flexible residue upgrading approach known as the Residue Solvent Refining (RSR) process. The new process utilizes a selective solvent mixture for the extraction and deasphalting of atmospheric and vacuum residues. The unique feature of the process is the ability to utilize low pressure equipment, thereby making it possible to convert existing idle crude distillation units to Residue Solvent Refining (RSR) units. Once converted, the RSR unit can increase the availability of suitable quality feedstocks for downstream conversion units, while providing added processing flexibility.