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Title: Reducing NO{sub x} while maintaining boiler performance using constrained sequential optimization

Abstract

Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) utilizes boiler tuning as an integral part of their compliance strategy to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. A desirable tuning solution should be effective not only for minimizing NO{sub x} emissions but also offer opportunities for improved thermal performance leading to cost savings and a rapid return on investment. Guided by these objectives, LILCO decided to apply a new technology, co-developed by EPRI, described as Sequential Process Optimization (SPO) which makes possible immediate reductions in NO{sub x} while constraining other emission and thermal performance parameters to avoid any adverse effects. Known as the ULTRAMAX Method this implementation of SPO consists of computer software and the supporting methodology which builds on existing boiler system knowledge and guides the operator through a sequence of control parameter adjustments to achieve ever-improving levels of performance. It is utilized during normal operations and can be applied to boiler systems of virtually any design. This paper describes an application of this SPO technology to an oil-fired boiler system after many successes with coal-fired systems. NO{sub x} was reduced by about 30% from previously untuned baseline conditions at full load with less than two weeks ofmore » effort.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Long Island Lighting Co., Melville, NY (United States). Environmental Engineering Dept.
  2. PowerMAX Service of Ultramax Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
271864
Report Number(s):
CONF-950196-
TRN: IM9635%%291
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Air & Waste Management Association (AWMA) conference on acid rain & electric utilits: permits, allowances, monitoring & meteorology, Tempe, AZ (United States), 23-25 Jan 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Acid rain and electric utilities: Permits, allowances, monitoring and meteorology; Dayal, P. [ed.] [Tucson Electric Power Co., AZ (United States)]; PB: 940 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; NITROGEN OXIDES; NEW YORK; BOILERS; PERFORMANCE

Citation Formats

Teetz, R., and Patterson, P.D.. Reducing NO{sub x} while maintaining boiler performance using constrained sequential optimization. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Teetz, R., & Patterson, P.D.. Reducing NO{sub x} while maintaining boiler performance using constrained sequential optimization. United States.
Teetz, R., and Patterson, P.D.. Sun . "Reducing NO{sub x} while maintaining boiler performance using constrained sequential optimization". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_271864,
title = {Reducing NO{sub x} while maintaining boiler performance using constrained sequential optimization},
author = {Teetz, R. and Patterson, P.D.},
abstractNote = {Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) utilizes boiler tuning as an integral part of their compliance strategy to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. A desirable tuning solution should be effective not only for minimizing NO{sub x} emissions but also offer opportunities for improved thermal performance leading to cost savings and a rapid return on investment. Guided by these objectives, LILCO decided to apply a new technology, co-developed by EPRI, described as Sequential Process Optimization (SPO) which makes possible immediate reductions in NO{sub x} while constraining other emission and thermal performance parameters to avoid any adverse effects. Known as the ULTRAMAX Method this implementation of SPO consists of computer software and the supporting methodology which builds on existing boiler system knowledge and guides the operator through a sequence of control parameter adjustments to achieve ever-improving levels of performance. It is utilized during normal operations and can be applied to boiler systems of virtually any design. This paper describes an application of this SPO technology to an oil-fired boiler system after many successes with coal-fired systems. NO{sub x} was reduced by about 30% from previously untuned baseline conditions at full load with less than two weeks of effort.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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  • The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) utilizes boiler tuning as an integral part of their compliance strategy to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. A desirable tuning solution should not only be effective for minimizing NOx emissions but also should offer opportunities for improved thermal performance leading to cost savings and a rapid return on investment. Guided by these objectives, TVA decided to apply the ULTRAMAX Method, which utilizes a new technology, co-developed by EPRI and Ultramax Corp., called sequential process optimization. This technology makes possible immediate reductions in NOx while constraining other emission and thermalmore » performance parameters to avoid any adverse effects. The ULTRAMAX Method consists of a methodology and the supporting computer software that builds on existing boiler system knowledge and guides the operator through a sequence of control parameter adjustments to achieve ever-improving levels of performance. It is utilized during normal operations and can be applied to boiler systems of virtually any design. The software can be integrated with a data acquisition system to provide an operator advisory capability. This paper describes an application of sequential process optimization technology to six mid-sized, older-vintage coal-fired boilers. The optimization project took place from September through November 1994. The results were significant reductions of NOx from previously untuned baseline conditions at full load, with little more than two weeks of effort. In addition, heat rate and LOI reductions were achieved for some units.« less
  • Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) utilizes boiler tuning as an integral part of their compliance strategy to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. A desirable tuning solution should not only be effective for minimizing NOx emissions but should also offer opportunities for improved thermal performance leading to cost savings and a rapid return on investment. Guided by these objectives, LILCO decided to apply a new EPRI co-developed technology described as Sequential Process Optimization (SPO) which makes possible readily identifiable reductions in NOx while constraining other emission and thermal performance parameters to avoid any adverse effects.more » Known as the ULTRAMAX Method this implementation of SPO consists of computer software and the supporting methodology which builds on existing boiler system knowledge and guides the operator through a sequence of control parameter adjustments to achieve ever-improving levels of performance. It is utilized during normal operations and can be applied to boiler systems of virtually any design. This paper describes the first application of this SPO technology to an oil-fired boiler system after many successes with coal-fired systems. NOx was reduced by about 30% from previously untuned baseline conditions at full load with less than two weeks of effort. The procedures and features of ULTRAMAX are also explained.« less
  • The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) utilizes boiler tuning as an integral part of their compliance strategy to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. A desirable tuning solution should not only be effective for minimizing NO{sub x} emissions but also should offer opportunities for improved thermal performance leading to cost savings and a rapid return on investment. Guided by these objectives, TVA applied the ULTRAMAX Method, which utilizes a new technology, co-developed by EPRI and Ultramax Corp., called sequential process optimization. This technology makes possible immediate reductions in NO{sub x} while constraining other emission and thermalmore » performance parameters to avoid adverse effects. The ULTRAMAX Method consists of a methodology and the supporting computer software that builds on existing boiler system knowledge and guides the operator through a sequence of control parameter adjustments to achieve ever-improving levels of performance. It is utilized during normal operations and can be tailored to boiler systems of virtually any design. The software can be integrated with a data acquisition system to provide an operator advisory capability. This paper describes an application of sequential process optimization technology to six mid-sized, older-vintage coal-fired boilers. The optimization project took place from September through November 1994. The results were significant reductions of NO{sub x} from the previous baseline conditions at full load, with little more than two weeks of effort. In addition, heat rate and LOI reductions were achieved for some units.« less
  • A technology provided by Ultramax Corporation and EPRI, based on sequential process optimization (SPO), is being used as a cost-effective tool to gain improvements prior to decisions for capital-intensive solutions. This empirical method of optimization, called the ULTRAMAX{reg_sign} Method, can determine the best boiler capabilities and help delay, or even avoid, expensive retrofits or repowering. SPO can serve as a least-cost way to attain the right degree of compliance with current and future phases of CAAA. Tuning ensures a staged strategy to stay ahead of emissions regulations, but not so far ahead as to cause regret for taking actions thatmore » ultimately are not mandated or warranted. One large utility investigating SPO as a tool to lower NO{sub x} emissions and to optimize boiler performance is Detroit Edison. The company has applied SPO to tune two coal-fired units at its River Rouge Power Plant to evaluate the technology for possible system-wide usage. Following the successful demonstration in reducing NO{sub x} from these units, SPO is being considered for use in other Detroit Edison fossil-fired plants. Tuning first will be used as a least-cost option to drive NO{sub x} to its lowest level with operating adjustment. In addition, optimization shows the true capability of the units and the margins available when the Phase 2 rules become effective in 2000. This paper includes a case study of the second tuning process and discusses the opportunities the technology affords.« less
  • Existing fossil-fired electric power generation systems can operate with significantly lower levels of NO{sub x} and other undesirable emissions, while maintaining or improving heat rate, by optimizing adjustments to the input/control parameters of the combustion system. This is being achieved in about ten shifts of regular operations with Sequential Process Optimization (SPO) technology, without capital expenditures, historical data or prior models. As measurements or calculations of critical outputs are available, SPO sequentially provides advices for adjustment to input parameters in order to converge toward the optimum, and thereafter maintain it. The ULTRAMAX SPO is based on unique statistical and mathematicalmore » methods to sequentially: (1) generate new knowledge (prediction models for all outputs) from sequential operating data, and (2) sequentially define new input adjustments through synthesis with the integration of these models, to achieve overall process performance improvements. The SPO Technology is part of the ULTRAMAX Method, which includes a complete strategy for achieving multiple objectives tailored to fit the specifics of each operation, and defining personnel procedures. At an engineering level it provides for sensitivity analyses to understand certain bottlenecks which may be worth resolving through retrofits. This solution, in part co-developed by EPRI, was introduced into the power industry in late `93 after a variety of validation studies. Since then there have been a series of commercial applications with U.S. utility companies, where ROI`s have been in the order of one month. Six case studies are presented which have various combinations of objectives such as reduction in NO{sub x}, CO, opacity, LOI and Heat Rates.« less