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Title: Economic convergence of environmental control and advanced technology

Abstract

Emerging advanced technologies for environmental control have many advantages over conventional, single pollutant removal processes. Features include high efficiencies, multiple pollutant control and zero waste streams. In the past, the economics for state-of-the-art emission control processes could not compete with proven, low-efficiency scrubbers that create throw away by-products. With the implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), the entire economic environment has changed. If a single process can provide a facility`s compliance requirements for Title I, Title III and Title IV of the CAAA, its net costs can be lower than conventional technology and actually provide economic incentives for overcontrol. The emission allowance program is maturing and the annual revenues from overcontrol of SO{sub 2} are easily quantified. The economics of NO{sub x} control and offsets are currently being realized as EPA identified Title IV requirements, and facilities begin to realize the impact from Title I NO{sub x} control. Air toxic control from Title III could require yet a third control process for a facility to maintain emission compliance. The costs associated with single control strategies vs. multiple pollutant control processes will be discussed and compared. This paper will also present a specific application of the NOXSO Process andmore » identify the potential advantages that can transform advanced technologies, like NOXSO, into the prudent solution for overall environmental compliance.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. NOXSO Corp., Bethel Park, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
271844
Report Number(s):
CONF-950196-
TRN: IM9635%%271
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Air & Waste Management Association (AWMA) conference on acid rain & electric utilits: permits, allowances, monitoring & meteorology, Tempe, AZ (United States), 23-25 Jan 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Acid rain and electric utilities: Permits, allowances, monitoring and meteorology; Dayal, P. [ed.] [Tucson Electric Power Co., AZ (United States)]; PB: 940 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; CLEAN AIR ACTS; IMPLEMENTATION; SULFUR DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; NITROGEN OXIDES; NOXSO PROCESS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; WASTE MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

Bolli, R.E., and Haslbeck, J.L. Economic convergence of environmental control and advanced technology. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Bolli, R.E., & Haslbeck, J.L. Economic convergence of environmental control and advanced technology. United States.
Bolli, R.E., and Haslbeck, J.L. 1995. "Economic convergence of environmental control and advanced technology". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_271844,
title = {Economic convergence of environmental control and advanced technology},
author = {Bolli, R.E. and Haslbeck, J.L.},
abstractNote = {Emerging advanced technologies for environmental control have many advantages over conventional, single pollutant removal processes. Features include high efficiencies, multiple pollutant control and zero waste streams. In the past, the economics for state-of-the-art emission control processes could not compete with proven, low-efficiency scrubbers that create throw away by-products. With the implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), the entire economic environment has changed. If a single process can provide a facility`s compliance requirements for Title I, Title III and Title IV of the CAAA, its net costs can be lower than conventional technology and actually provide economic incentives for overcontrol. The emission allowance program is maturing and the annual revenues from overcontrol of SO{sub 2} are easily quantified. The economics of NO{sub x} control and offsets are currently being realized as EPA identified Title IV requirements, and facilities begin to realize the impact from Title I NO{sub x} control. Air toxic control from Title III could require yet a third control process for a facility to maintain emission compliance. The costs associated with single control strategies vs. multiple pollutant control processes will be discussed and compared. This paper will also present a specific application of the NOXSO Process and identify the potential advantages that can transform advanced technologies, like NOXSO, into the prudent solution for overall environmental compliance.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Conference:
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