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Title: Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds

Abstract

During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. and Penner et al. have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate (-1 to -2 W/m{sup 2}) which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth`s radiative budget either directly by scattering and absorption of solar radiation by themselves or indirectly by altering the cloud radiative properties through changes in cloud microstructure. Marine stratocumulus cloud layers and their possible cooling influence on the atmosphere as a result of pollution are of special interest because of their high reflectivity, durability, and large global cover. We present an estimate of thet aerosol indirect effect, or, forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.
OSTI Identifier:
263524
Report Number(s):
CONF-9503140-
ON: DE96010942; CNN: Grant NA37RJ0203;Project 144880-A91; TRN: 96:003652-0028
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 5. atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) science team meeting, San Diego, CA (United States), 19-23 Mar 1995; Other Information: PBD: Apr 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the fifth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting; PB: 421 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; CLOUDS; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; SULFATES; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; AEROSOLS; ABSORPTION; LAYERS; REFLECTIVITY; SCATTERING; SOLAR RADIATION; ALBEDO; COOLING; AIR POLLUTION; CLIMATIC CHANGE

Citation Formats

Kogan, Z.N., Kogan, Y.L., and Lilly, D.K. Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Kogan, Z.N., Kogan, Y.L., & Lilly, D.K. Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds. United States.
Kogan, Z.N., Kogan, Y.L., and Lilly, D.K. Mon . "Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/263524.
@article{osti_263524,
title = {Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds},
author = {Kogan, Z.N. and Kogan, Y.L. and Lilly, D.K.},
abstractNote = {During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. and Penner et al. have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate (-1 to -2 W/m{sup 2}) which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth`s radiative budget either directly by scattering and absorption of solar radiation by themselves or indirectly by altering the cloud radiative properties through changes in cloud microstructure. Marine stratocumulus cloud layers and their possible cooling influence on the atmosphere as a result of pollution are of special interest because of their high reflectivity, durability, and large global cover. We present an estimate of thet aerosol indirect effect, or, forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Mon Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
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