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Title: Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads

Abstract

This paper presents a methodology to calculate the impingement load in the region of a submerged turbulent jet where a potential core exits and the jet is not fully developed. The profile of the jet flow velocities is represented by a piece-wise linear function which satisfies the conservation of momentum flux of the jet flow. The adequacy of the of the predicted jet expansion is further verified by considering the continuity of the jet flow from the region of potential core to the fully developed region. The jet impingement load can be calculated either as a direct impingement force or a drag force using the jet velocity field determined by the methodology presented.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
258092
Report Number(s):
WSRC-TR-96-0064; CONF-960706-26
ON: DE96060044; TRN: 96:016931
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-89SR18035
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) pressure vessels and piping conference, Montreal (Canada), 21-26 Jul 1996; Other Information: PBD: 4 Mar 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; PUMPS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE FACILITIES; JETS; SLURRIES; TANKS; LIQUID WASTES

Citation Formats

Wu, T.T.. Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Wu, T.T.. Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads. United States.
Wu, T.T.. Mon . "Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/258092.
@article{osti_258092,
title = {Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads},
author = {Wu, T.T.},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a methodology to calculate the impingement load in the region of a submerged turbulent jet where a potential core exits and the jet is not fully developed. The profile of the jet flow velocities is represented by a piece-wise linear function which satisfies the conservation of momentum flux of the jet flow. The adequacy of the of the predicted jet expansion is further verified by considering the continuity of the jet flow from the region of potential core to the fully developed region. The jet impingement load can be calculated either as a direct impingement force or a drag force using the jet velocity field determined by the methodology presented.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 04 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Mon Mar 04 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
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