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Title: Abrasion protection in process piping

Abstract

Process piping often is subjected to failure from abrasion or a combination of abrasion and corrosion. Abrasion is a complex phenomenon, with many factors involved to varying degrees. Hard, mineral based alumina ceramic and basalt materials are used to provide protection against abrasion in many piping systems. Successful life extension examples are presented from many different industries. Lined piping components require special attention with regard to operating conditions as well as design and engineering considerations. Economic justification involves direct cost comparisons and avoided costs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Abresist Corp., Urbana, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
253803
Report Number(s):
CONF-960156-
ISBN 1-57698-001-4; TRN: IM9630%%254
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. international symposium on the mechanical integrity of process piping, Houston, TX (United States), 30 Jan - 1 Feb 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Second international symposium on the mechanical integrity of process piping: Proceedings; Sims, J.R.; Aller, J.E.; Becht, C. IV; Reynolds, J.T.; Salot, W.J.; Sanders, B.J.; Springer, S.P. [eds.]; PB: 420 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; PIPELINES; EROSION; LINING PROCESSES; MITIGATION; ALUMINIUM OXIDES; SOLIDS FLOW; PNEUMATIC TRANSPORT; HYDRAULIC TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Accetta, J. Abrasion protection in process piping. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Accetta, J. Abrasion protection in process piping. United States.
Accetta, J. 1996. "Abrasion protection in process piping". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_253803,
title = {Abrasion protection in process piping},
author = {Accetta, J.},
abstractNote = {Process piping often is subjected to failure from abrasion or a combination of abrasion and corrosion. Abrasion is a complex phenomenon, with many factors involved to varying degrees. Hard, mineral based alumina ceramic and basalt materials are used to provide protection against abrasion in many piping systems. Successful life extension examples are presented from many different industries. Lined piping components require special attention with regard to operating conditions as well as design and engineering considerations. Economic justification involves direct cost comparisons and avoided costs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results formore » attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.« less
  • As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results formore » attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.« less
  • Fermilab has some 25,000 (7,600 meters) feet of bare steel high energy particle beam piping ranging in size from 6-inch to 72-inch (150 mm to 1,800 mm). The piping is used to contain high energy particle beams traveling from the accelerator ring to targets. The cathodic protection required a complex design to overcome many shielding problems and to avoid interference with the many other underground structures on the site. Since cathodic protection current traveling through some of the magnet enclosures could affect beam instrumentation, careful attention had to be paid to dielectric isolation. A combination of surface and deep anodesmore » were used, with special concern for environmental protection.« less
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