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Title: Five steps toward title V permitting

Abstract

Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments will have a profound effect on industry. Industry should be aware that preparing a Title V permit application is a significant undertaking. If a Title V operating permit is required, the recommended approach is described.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Environmental Science & Engineering, Gainsville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
245304
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Protection; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; MONITORING; POLLUTANTS; EMISSION; AMENDMENTS; CLEAN AIR ACTS; LICENSE APPLICATIONS; DOCUMENTATION; TOXIC MATERIALS; US EPA

Citation Formats

Shrock, J. Five steps toward title V permitting. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Shrock, J. Five steps toward title V permitting. United States.
Shrock, J. Wed . "Five steps toward title V permitting". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_245304,
title = {Five steps toward title V permitting},
author = {Shrock, J.},
abstractNote = {Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments will have a profound effect on industry. Industry should be aware that preparing a Title V permit application is a significant undertaking. If a Title V operating permit is required, the recommended approach is described.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environmental Protection},
number = 6,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}
  • The establishment of an operating permit program for air pollution sources represents the most significant procedural change to the Clean Air Act (CAA) in the 1990 amendments. The new operating permit Title V will drastically alter the way many companies comply with the CAA and will also lead to an increase in enforcement activity by EPA and states. This article summarizes the overall structure of Title V and EPA`s regulations, without attempting to cover every detail. Generally, where the regulations add little to the corresponding statuary provisions, the statute is cited. Otherwise, citations are to EPA`s part 70 operating permitmore » regulations.« less
  • Some small businesses subject to the Clean Air Act`s maximum achievable control technology (MACT) regulations may be a break from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While the businesses, considered non-major air-pollutant sources, must still meet all MACT requirements, they are likely to receive a Title V operating permit program deferral. On December 13, 1995, EPA proposed to defer Title V operating permit requirements for non-major sources in the following three industries: decorative chromium electroplating and chromium anodizing; perchloroethylene dry cleaning; ethylene oxide commercial sterilization and fumigation. In addition to describing its reasons for the temporary deferments, EPA sets forthmore » the rationale for permanently exempting certain non-major electroplating and anodizing sources. This rationale may pave the way for small businesses in other industries to escape Title V.« less
  • Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires states to implement new air operating permit programs. States have a great deal of flexibility in developing their permit programs. Industry should work now to ensure that state programs contain the favorable aspects of the federal regulations and do not contain more stringent requirements that are not required under the Clean Air Act. This article outlines areas of the permit program that have the potential to handicap industry`s ability to expand.
  • Now that some state regulatory agencies are reviewing Title V permit applications and issuing permits, evaluation of the process can be made in comparison with the original goals of the Title V permitting program. In addition, assessment of the terms and conditions that are being incorporated into permits, the nature of draft permits that are issued to facilities for comment, and the extent and type of negotiation that have been conducted with agencies to develop successful Title V permits, will be helpful for facilities that are currently undergoing application review. In working with a Fortune 500 surface coating company, fourteenmore » Title V permit applications were developed and submitted for plants located in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Illinois, Georgia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Indiana and southern California. Draft permits have been issued for several of the plants, and differences in the terms and conditions, testing requirements, and permit format and structure have been noted between states. One of the issued permits required modification, and the process was one of the first for this state agency.« less