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Title: Air compliance falls short without CEMs

Abstract

Four titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 refer to or require the use of continuous emission moniotrs (CEMs). The code of Federal regulations, Title 40, part 60, Appendix B lists the Performance Specifications for the design, installation and initial performance evaluation of CEMs. Emission monitors are required by 40 CFR 503 for sewage sludge incinerators and by 40 CFR 264/266 foir boilers and industrial furnaces. Technology advances of CEMs are discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
245303
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Protection; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; AIR POLLUTION MONITORS; PERFORMANCE; DESIGN; MAINTENANCE; SULFUR DIOXIDE; MONITORING; NITROGEN OXIDES; BOILERS; FURNACES; INCINERATORS; INSTALLATION; SEWAGE SLUDGE; CLEAN AIR ACTS; FOSSIL FUELS

Citation Formats

Wagner, G.H. II. Air compliance falls short without CEMs. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Wagner, G.H. II. Air compliance falls short without CEMs. United States.
Wagner, G.H. II. Wed . "Air compliance falls short without CEMs". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_245303,
title = {Air compliance falls short without CEMs},
author = {Wagner, G.H. II},
abstractNote = {Four titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 refer to or require the use of continuous emission moniotrs (CEMs). The code of Federal regulations, Title 40, part 60, Appendix B lists the Performance Specifications for the design, installation and initial performance evaluation of CEMs. Emission monitors are required by 40 CFR 503 for sewage sludge incinerators and by 40 CFR 264/266 foir boilers and industrial furnaces. Technology advances of CEMs are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environmental Protection},
number = 6,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}
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