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Title: SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

Abstract

Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
2340
Report Number(s):
SAND98-2287C
ON: DE00002340
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Government Microcircuit Applications Conference Digest; Monterey, CA; 03/08-12/1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Foams; Electric Conductivity; Physical Radiation Effects

Citation Formats

Ballard, W.P., Beutler, D.E., Burt, M., Dudley, K.J., and Stringer, T.A.. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Ballard, W.P., Beutler, D.E., Burt, M., Dudley, K.J., & Stringer, T.A.. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam. United States.
Ballard, W.P., Beutler, D.E., Burt, M., Dudley, K.J., and Stringer, T.A.. Mon . "SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/2340.
@article{osti_2340,
title = {SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam},
author = {Ballard, W.P. and Beutler, D.E. and Burt, M. and Dudley, K.J. and Stringer, T.A.},
abstractNote = {Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 14 00:00:00 EST 1998},
month = {Mon Dec 14 00:00:00 EST 1998}
}

Conference:
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