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Title: Rain underscores need for injection

Abstract

Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
232026
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geothermal Hot Line; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEYSERS GEOTHERMAL FIELD; STEAM GENERATION; RAIN WATER; INJECTION; STEAM; PRODUCTION; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; INJECTION WELLS; PIPELINES

Citation Formats

Stelling, K.F. Rain underscores need for injection. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Stelling, K.F. Rain underscores need for injection. United States.
Stelling, K.F. 1996. "Rain underscores need for injection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_232026,
title = {Rain underscores need for injection},
author = {Stelling, K.F.},
abstractNote = {Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.},
doi = {},
journal = {Geothermal Hot Line},
number = 1,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 1
}
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