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Title: A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

Abstract

Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
231978
Report Number(s):
ANL/CMB/CP-89216; CONF-9606173-1
ON: DE96010792; TRN: 96:003144
DOE Contract Number:
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1996. Federation of European Microbiological Societies (FEMS), Estoril (Portugal), 2-6 Jun 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; HEAT-SHOCK PROTEINS; BIOSYNTHESIS; BACTERIA; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TOLERANCE; BIOLOGICAL STRESS

Citation Formats

Trent, J.D.. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Trent, J.D.. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea. United States.
Trent, J.D.. Wed . "A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/231978.
@article{osti_231978,
title = {A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea},
author = {Trent, J.D.},
abstractNote = {Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Wed May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}

Conference:
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