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Title: Effects of bulkheads made of pressure-treated wood on estuarine benthos

Abstract

Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood is in very common use for pilings and bulkheads. Studies of benthic effects of bulkheads include chemical analyses of sediments, chemical analysis of uptake by benthic organisms, and the benthic community structure at different distances from the bulkhead. The authors have measured these parameters at a number of CCA bulkheads, at two bulkheads constructed of other materials (untreated hardwood, aluminum) and at unbulkheaded sites. Sediments adjacent to CCA bulkheads had elevated Cu, Cr, and As in the fine particulate fraction, and the concentration of contaminants decreased with distance. However, the percentage of fine particles increased with distance (to 10 or 20 m) as the sandy sediments adjacent to the bulkheads became siltier with greater depth. Benthic organisms (polychaete worms) had the highest body burdens of the contaminants right at the bulkhead and generally decreased with distance, up to 20 m. The benthic community was evaluated by species richness, Shannon-Wiener diversity index, total number of individuals, and dry weight. These parameters were lowest immediately adjacent to CCA wood bulkheads, and recovered at distances where the amount of contamination of the fine particles was reduced. There was not a comparable reduction in the benthic community adjacent tomore » bulkheads made of other materials. The effects of CCA wood were greatest by new wood, and in areas that were poorly flushed. Pilings in well-flushed areas produced no measurable effects.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences
  2. New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Injury Science
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
230909
Report Number(s):
CONF-9511137-
ISBN 1-880611-03-1; TRN: IM9623%%219
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) world conference, Vancouver (Canada), 5-9 Nov 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Second SETAC world congress (16. annual meeting): Abstract book. Global environmental protection: Science, politics, and common sense; PB: 378 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; ESTUARIES; WATER POLLUTION; SEDIMENTS; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; COPPER; TOXICITY; CHROMIUM; ARSENIC; ANNELIDS; SENSITIVITY; BENTHOS

Citation Formats

Weis, J.S., and Weis, P.. Effects of bulkheads made of pressure-treated wood on estuarine benthos. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Weis, J.S., & Weis, P.. Effects of bulkheads made of pressure-treated wood on estuarine benthos. United States.
Weis, J.S., and Weis, P.. 1995. "Effects of bulkheads made of pressure-treated wood on estuarine benthos". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_230909,
title = {Effects of bulkheads made of pressure-treated wood on estuarine benthos},
author = {Weis, J.S. and Weis, P.},
abstractNote = {Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood is in very common use for pilings and bulkheads. Studies of benthic effects of bulkheads include chemical analyses of sediments, chemical analysis of uptake by benthic organisms, and the benthic community structure at different distances from the bulkhead. The authors have measured these parameters at a number of CCA bulkheads, at two bulkheads constructed of other materials (untreated hardwood, aluminum) and at unbulkheaded sites. Sediments adjacent to CCA bulkheads had elevated Cu, Cr, and As in the fine particulate fraction, and the concentration of contaminants decreased with distance. However, the percentage of fine particles increased with distance (to 10 or 20 m) as the sandy sediments adjacent to the bulkheads became siltier with greater depth. Benthic organisms (polychaete worms) had the highest body burdens of the contaminants right at the bulkhead and generally decreased with distance, up to 20 m. The benthic community was evaluated by species richness, Shannon-Wiener diversity index, total number of individuals, and dry weight. These parameters were lowest immediately adjacent to CCA wood bulkheads, and recovered at distances where the amount of contamination of the fine particles was reduced. There was not a comparable reduction in the benthic community adjacent to bulkheads made of other materials. The effects of CCA wood were greatest by new wood, and in areas that were poorly flushed. Pilings in well-flushed areas produced no measurable effects.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

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