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Title: Plant uses closed-capture technology to improve air quality, reduce energy

Abstract

Ford Motor Company`s Cleveland Engine Plant 2 is a 1.5 million ft{sup 2} (1.4 km{sup 2}) engine manufacturing facility in Brook Park, Ohio, that was built in phases starting in 1953. Forty years later a challenge was made to upgrade the plant into a world-class powertrain facility. This was part of a series of major plant modernizations. The success of the project allowed for the installation of the world`s largest engine test carousel (85 feet or 2,590 cm) and a complete upgrade of the mechanical systems. The existing machining operations generated oil mist that migrated throughout the facility, and with it, increased plant humidity levels. Even with high ventilation rates, this condition caused numerous employee complaints. The existing pneumatic control systems were not able to coordinate the operation of the building air handling system to meet process equipment exhaust requirements. This condition resulted in the facility operating at an extreme negative pressure. This article describes the design of the system which includes: a direct-fired, natural gas heating system for all air handling equipment to replace existing steam and condensate systems; chilled-water cooling coils in all air handling units serving manufacturing and assembly areas to reduce the supply air temperature; centralmore » chilled-water system including chilled-water thermal storage tanks to serve building air handling units, office areas, and process equipment; renovation of selected building exhaust fans to provide truss space heat relief and smoke evacuation; enclosure of machining equipment to prevent oil mist migration into the plant; and a programmable logic controller-based management system that interfaced to the client`s plant floor information system.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Albert Kahn Associates, Detroit, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
230824
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ASHRAE Journal; Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; SPACE HVAC SYSTEMS; AIR QUALITY; ENERGY CONSERVATION; AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY; FUME HOODS; VENTILATION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Cole, J.P. Plant uses closed-capture technology to improve air quality, reduce energy. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Cole, J.P. Plant uses closed-capture technology to improve air quality, reduce energy. United States.
Cole, J.P. 1996. "Plant uses closed-capture technology to improve air quality, reduce energy". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_230824,
title = {Plant uses closed-capture technology to improve air quality, reduce energy},
author = {Cole, J.P.},
abstractNote = {Ford Motor Company`s Cleveland Engine Plant 2 is a 1.5 million ft{sup 2} (1.4 km{sup 2}) engine manufacturing facility in Brook Park, Ohio, that was built in phases starting in 1953. Forty years later a challenge was made to upgrade the plant into a world-class powertrain facility. This was part of a series of major plant modernizations. The success of the project allowed for the installation of the world`s largest engine test carousel (85 feet or 2,590 cm) and a complete upgrade of the mechanical systems. The existing machining operations generated oil mist that migrated throughout the facility, and with it, increased plant humidity levels. Even with high ventilation rates, this condition caused numerous employee complaints. The existing pneumatic control systems were not able to coordinate the operation of the building air handling system to meet process equipment exhaust requirements. This condition resulted in the facility operating at an extreme negative pressure. This article describes the design of the system which includes: a direct-fired, natural gas heating system for all air handling equipment to replace existing steam and condensate systems; chilled-water cooling coils in all air handling units serving manufacturing and assembly areas to reduce the supply air temperature; central chilled-water system including chilled-water thermal storage tanks to serve building air handling units, office areas, and process equipment; renovation of selected building exhaust fans to provide truss space heat relief and smoke evacuation; enclosure of machining equipment to prevent oil mist migration into the plant; and a programmable logic controller-based management system that interfaced to the client`s plant floor information system.},
doi = {},
journal = {ASHRAE Journal},
number = 3,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 3
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Errors involved in the utilization of medical devices are discussed with regard to equipment design and misadministration.
  • The use of a simple device, to be held in the mouth, which colllimates, shields, facilitates aiming, and holds the film during dental x ray is described. The device collimates the beam to dimensions only slightly larger than those required for exposure of the film. It also permits aiming of the machine by technical personnel, reduces irradiation of the patient to a small fraction of that involved in conventional techniques, and improves the quality of the roentgenograms by minimizing scattering from adjacent tissues. The device consists of a stainless steel circular collimator with a rectangular window. Attached to the collimatormore » is an arm which holds the film in proper relation to the window. Reduction of exit rays is accomplished by a metal supporting shield behind the film in exposure of periapical and bitewing views in adults and children. Though applicable to both long- and shortcone techniques, the device can be used more simply with the long cone. The opening (1.62 in/sup 2.) in the collimator passes 23% instead of the actual 19% of the 3-in. beam needed for the film. It was calculated that the combination used, a 0.0026-in. lead film backing and 0.051-in. stainless steel film support, transmits 3% at 65 kvp and 10% at 90 kvp. These values were checked by measuring transmission, using x-ray film as a radiation detector, and approximate agreement was obtained with these calculations. Considering all reductions of the beam by collimator, film backing, and shield, it was found that at 65 kvp 11% of the original beam passes beyond the film plane with this device and that the irradiation of the tissue between the cone and the plane of the film is reduced to 26% of that which would take place without the device. It is concluded that with this device the safety of dental roentgenology is improved many fold. (H.H.D.)« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate whether the daily intake of synbiotics interferes in radiation-induced acute proctitis symptoms and in quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer were randomized to intake either a synbiotic powder containing Lactobacillus reuteri 10{sup 8} colony-forming units and 4.3 g of soluble fiber (Nestlé) or placebo. The questionnaire EORTC QLQ-PRT23 was applied before the beginning of radiation therapy and in every week for the first 4 weeks of treatment. The sum of both the complete (proctitis symptoms plus quality of life) and partial (proctitis symptoms) scoresmore » of the EORTC QLQ-PRT23 (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Module for Proctitis–23 items) questionnaire were the main endpoints. Results: This pilot study showed that the complete questionnaire score (median [range]) was higher in the second (23 [21-30] vs 26.5 [22-34], P<.05) and third (23 [21-32] vs 27.5 [24-33], P<.01) weeks in the placebo group. Proctitis symptoms were highest scored in the placebo group in both the second (19.5 [16-25]) and third (19 [17-24]) weeks than in the synbiotic group (week 2: 16.5 [15-20], P<.05; week 3: 17 [15-23], P<.01). In both scores the placebo group had a significantly higher result (P<.01) than the synbiotic group (repeated-measures analysis of variance). Conclusions: Synbiotics reduce proctitis symptoms and improve quality of life in radiation-induced acute proctitis during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.« less
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