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Title: Streamlining Stakeholder Data Accessibility Utilizing Web-Based GIS Capabilities - 18672

Abstract

Environmental data is often complex, and it can be difficult to provide proper context to fully understand and comprehensively analyze the data. One tool identified to better present complicated data is the use of web-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Web-based GIS provides much-needed visual context to the complex data collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By overlaying environmental data atop relevant geographical features, such as topography, surface or subsurface geology, hydrogeological features, buildings, roads, and technical areas, LANL's diverse group of stakeholders are better able to understand environmental data collected at the LANL site within the framework of the surrounding geography. Since 2012, Los Alamos has utilized a web-based GIS module in the Intellus New Mexico data-sharing web site. This web site provides unfettered public access to LANL and New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) - Department of Energy (DOE) Oversight Bureau environmental data. Through the past five years of real world experience, LANL identified areas where questions and confusion arose, particularly for those not directly associated with the site's environmental cleanup mission. In order to query the millions of records in Intellus in a meaningful way, users had to have substantial knowledge of the data organization and nomenclature aheadmore » of time. While this was not a challenge for LANL and NMED environmental scientists, it proved to be a substantial barrier for members of the general public to utilize Intellus. In 2017, LANL initiated an Intellus redesign with the goal of deconstructing the type of questions people asked and identifying the types of user personas accessing the site to engineer a simpler path to desired data sets. Greatly simplified click paths ('Quick Paths') were created that walk the user through the basics with a minimum of jargon and a strong reliance on mapping results for easy visualization. The improved mapping was enabled by an upgraded online GIS functionality that allowed LANL to easily integrate their own base-maps to provide users the most up to date views of their data. The integrated Intellus GIS was enhanced to assimilate with LANL's dynamic base maps and site information in relation to data collection activities, to avoid outdated presentations. A simplified user interface (UI) was added and easier data querying was designed. A more robust visual presentation was created that allowed better viewing of spatial data. All data queries in the new simplified 'Quick Path' give the users the option to map the results and save their results to their optional accounts. This brings the power of GIS visualization to all users without the need for GIS knowledge or extensive training. By integrating with Esri{sup R} technologies, base-map layers in ArcGIS Online{sup R} can be updated by LANL or other data providers at any time and reflected immediately in the Intellus mapping application called GIS+ 1. Users can even load additional map layers to GIS+ that contain their own spatial data or information shared from over a million users on ArcGIS Online{sup R}, such as ecological information from the Fish and Wildlife Service, or geology layers from the USGS. The results from the improved quick path search in Intellus can be viewed in GIS+ and analyzed using Esri's{sup R} Smart Mapping technology, which makes it easy to classify results with its visual representation of the results in an interactive histogram, where sliders can be dragged to look at various intervals for each color range for that query. With enhanced GIS+, Los Alamos National Laboratory is able to observe improve Stakeholder engagement and positive Stakeholder interactions within its public environmental database, Intellus New Mexico. (authors)« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)
  2. Locus Technologies (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, Inc., PO Box 27646, 85285-7646 Tempe, AZ (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22977899
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-20-WM-18672
TRN: US21V0528017944
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2018: 44. Annual Waste Management Conference, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 18-22 Mar 2018; Other Information: Country of input: France; 1 refs.; Available online at: https://www.xcdsystem.com/wmsym/2018/index.html
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; COMMUNICATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DATA COMPILATION; ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION; GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS; GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION; LANL; MAPPING; MAPS; NEW MEXICO; TOPOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Patel, Nita, Sandborgh, Sean, and Pierce, Todd. Streamlining Stakeholder Data Accessibility Utilizing Web-Based GIS Capabilities - 18672. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Patel, Nita, Sandborgh, Sean, & Pierce, Todd. Streamlining Stakeholder Data Accessibility Utilizing Web-Based GIS Capabilities - 18672. United States.
Patel, Nita, Sandborgh, Sean, and Pierce, Todd. Sun . "Streamlining Stakeholder Data Accessibility Utilizing Web-Based GIS Capabilities - 18672". United States.
@article{osti_22977899,
title = {Streamlining Stakeholder Data Accessibility Utilizing Web-Based GIS Capabilities - 18672},
author = {Patel, Nita and Sandborgh, Sean and Pierce, Todd},
abstractNote = {Environmental data is often complex, and it can be difficult to provide proper context to fully understand and comprehensively analyze the data. One tool identified to better present complicated data is the use of web-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Web-based GIS provides much-needed visual context to the complex data collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By overlaying environmental data atop relevant geographical features, such as topography, surface or subsurface geology, hydrogeological features, buildings, roads, and technical areas, LANL's diverse group of stakeholders are better able to understand environmental data collected at the LANL site within the framework of the surrounding geography. Since 2012, Los Alamos has utilized a web-based GIS module in the Intellus New Mexico data-sharing web site. This web site provides unfettered public access to LANL and New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) - Department of Energy (DOE) Oversight Bureau environmental data. Through the past five years of real world experience, LANL identified areas where questions and confusion arose, particularly for those not directly associated with the site's environmental cleanup mission. In order to query the millions of records in Intellus in a meaningful way, users had to have substantial knowledge of the data organization and nomenclature ahead of time. While this was not a challenge for LANL and NMED environmental scientists, it proved to be a substantial barrier for members of the general public to utilize Intellus. In 2017, LANL initiated an Intellus redesign with the goal of deconstructing the type of questions people asked and identifying the types of user personas accessing the site to engineer a simpler path to desired data sets. Greatly simplified click paths ('Quick Paths') were created that walk the user through the basics with a minimum of jargon and a strong reliance on mapping results for easy visualization. The improved mapping was enabled by an upgraded online GIS functionality that allowed LANL to easily integrate their own base-maps to provide users the most up to date views of their data. The integrated Intellus GIS was enhanced to assimilate with LANL's dynamic base maps and site information in relation to data collection activities, to avoid outdated presentations. A simplified user interface (UI) was added and easier data querying was designed. A more robust visual presentation was created that allowed better viewing of spatial data. All data queries in the new simplified 'Quick Path' give the users the option to map the results and save their results to their optional accounts. This brings the power of GIS visualization to all users without the need for GIS knowledge or extensive training. By integrating with Esri{sup R} technologies, base-map layers in ArcGIS Online{sup R} can be updated by LANL or other data providers at any time and reflected immediately in the Intellus mapping application called GIS+ 1. Users can even load additional map layers to GIS+ that contain their own spatial data or information shared from over a million users on ArcGIS Online{sup R}, such as ecological information from the Fish and Wildlife Service, or geology layers from the USGS. The results from the improved quick path search in Intellus can be viewed in GIS+ and analyzed using Esri's{sup R} Smart Mapping technology, which makes it easy to classify results with its visual representation of the results in an interactive histogram, where sliders can be dragged to look at various intervals for each color range for that query. With enhanced GIS+, Los Alamos National Laboratory is able to observe improve Stakeholder engagement and positive Stakeholder interactions within its public environmental database, Intellus New Mexico. (authors)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22977899}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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