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Title: Higher harmonic ultrasonic guided waves for structural integrity assessment of dry storage canisters - 15381

Abstract

Dry storage of used fuel from nuclear power plants has gone from an interim storage solution to a longer-term solution, which necessitates monitoring the integrity of the stainless steel canister that confines the used fuel. Since the storage facilities are located around the country in a variety of different environments there is a wide range of degradation mechanisms that could occur over time in the cylindrical canister. One potential degradation mode that has created significant concern is stress corrosion cracking. We propose using higher harmonic ultrasonic guided waves as a tool to nondestructively inspect used fuel canisters. Higher harmonics are generated when a wave propagates through a nonlinear elastic media. These higher harmonics have been shown to be quite sensitive to microstructural features such as dislocation substructures, persistent slip bands, precipitates, etc. The use of ultrasonic guided waves to inspect the canister is attractive due to the size of the canister and the ability of guided waves to inspect a reasonably large domain relative to traditional bulk wave ultrasonics. We will highlight our recent progress on theory, numerical simulations, and laboratory experiments to develop higher harmonic guided waves as a tool to detect microstructural changes that precede macro-scale damage. Analyzedmore » structures include plates and hollow cylinders, and we focus on localized damage initiation, as is the case for stress corrosion cracking. Recent experiments focus on using magnetostrictive transducers in activating the fundamental shear horizontal mode (SH0) and the third harmonic that is generated due to the material nonlinearity. The magnetostrictive transducer comprises a thin iron-cobalt foil, a meandering electric coil, and a permanent magnet. These transducers are inexpensive, easy to use, and are very efficient at generating shear waves. In applications where the wavelength is larger than the plate thickness, the waves are guided by the traction free boundary conditions and propagate in the plane of the plate. For this canister application, the shear horizontal waves energize the entire thickness of the canister and propagate along the shell in the direction dictated by the meander coil. Experiments indicate that magnetostrictive transducers can generate waves that propagate in plate thicknesses of 1 mm to at least 16 mm. The SH0 mode is nondispersive and generates a third harmonic of the same mode that is shown to be sensitive to localized plastic strain and unseen fatigue damage. It has a strong potential to detect the very early stages of stress corrosion cracking. Due to the geometric configuration of dry storage casks, the transducers will need to be delivered to the inspection points by a robotic system that navigates through the cask ventilation system. (authors)« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802 (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, Inc., PO Box 27646, 85285-7646 Tempe, AZ (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22824299
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-19-WM-15381
TRN: US19V0871069345
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2015: Annual Waste Management Symposium, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 15-19 Mar 2015; Other Information: Country of input: France; 19 refs.; available online at: http://archive.wmsym.org/2015/index.html
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; CASKS; COBALT; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CRACKS; DRY STORAGE; EXPERIMENT RESULTS; FATIGUE; INSPECTION; IRON; MAGNETOSTRICTION; MICROSTRUCTURE; MONITORING; PERMANENT MAGNETS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; STAINLESS STEELS; STORAGE FACILITIES; STRESS CORROSION; TRANSDUCERS; ULTRASONIC TESTING; VENTILATION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Choi, Gloria, Liu, Yang, and Lissenden, Cliff. Higher harmonic ultrasonic guided waves for structural integrity assessment of dry storage canisters - 15381. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Choi, Gloria, Liu, Yang, & Lissenden, Cliff. Higher harmonic ultrasonic guided waves for structural integrity assessment of dry storage canisters - 15381. United States.
Choi, Gloria, Liu, Yang, and Lissenden, Cliff. Wed . "Higher harmonic ultrasonic guided waves for structural integrity assessment of dry storage canisters - 15381". United States.
@article{osti_22824299,
title = {Higher harmonic ultrasonic guided waves for structural integrity assessment of dry storage canisters - 15381},
author = {Choi, Gloria and Liu, Yang and Lissenden, Cliff},
abstractNote = {Dry storage of used fuel from nuclear power plants has gone from an interim storage solution to a longer-term solution, which necessitates monitoring the integrity of the stainless steel canister that confines the used fuel. Since the storage facilities are located around the country in a variety of different environments there is a wide range of degradation mechanisms that could occur over time in the cylindrical canister. One potential degradation mode that has created significant concern is stress corrosion cracking. We propose using higher harmonic ultrasonic guided waves as a tool to nondestructively inspect used fuel canisters. Higher harmonics are generated when a wave propagates through a nonlinear elastic media. These higher harmonics have been shown to be quite sensitive to microstructural features such as dislocation substructures, persistent slip bands, precipitates, etc. The use of ultrasonic guided waves to inspect the canister is attractive due to the size of the canister and the ability of guided waves to inspect a reasonably large domain relative to traditional bulk wave ultrasonics. We will highlight our recent progress on theory, numerical simulations, and laboratory experiments to develop higher harmonic guided waves as a tool to detect microstructural changes that precede macro-scale damage. Analyzed structures include plates and hollow cylinders, and we focus on localized damage initiation, as is the case for stress corrosion cracking. Recent experiments focus on using magnetostrictive transducers in activating the fundamental shear horizontal mode (SH0) and the third harmonic that is generated due to the material nonlinearity. The magnetostrictive transducer comprises a thin iron-cobalt foil, a meandering electric coil, and a permanent magnet. These transducers are inexpensive, easy to use, and are very efficient at generating shear waves. In applications where the wavelength is larger than the plate thickness, the waves are guided by the traction free boundary conditions and propagate in the plane of the plate. For this canister application, the shear horizontal waves energize the entire thickness of the canister and propagate along the shell in the direction dictated by the meander coil. Experiments indicate that magnetostrictive transducers can generate waves that propagate in plate thicknesses of 1 mm to at least 16 mm. The SH0 mode is nondispersive and generates a third harmonic of the same mode that is shown to be sensitive to localized plastic strain and unseen fatigue damage. It has a strong potential to detect the very early stages of stress corrosion cracking. Due to the geometric configuration of dry storage casks, the transducers will need to be delivered to the inspection points by a robotic system that navigates through the cask ventilation system. (authors)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22824299}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {7}
}

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