skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Magnetorotational Mechanism of the Explosion of Core-Collapse Supernovae

Abstract

The idea of the magnetorotational explosion mechanism is that the energy of rotation of the neutron star formed in the course of a collapse is transformed into the energy of an expanding shock wave by means of a magnetic field. In the two-dimensional case, the time of this transformation depends weakly on the initial strength of the poloidal magnetic field because of the development of a magnetorotational instability. Differential rotation leads to the twisting and growth of the toroidal magnetic-field component, which becomes much stronger than the poloidal component. As a result, the development of the instability and an exponential growth of all field components occur. The explosion topology depends on the structure of the magnetic field. In the case where the initial configuration of the magnetic field is close to a dipole configuration, the ejection of matter has a jet character, whereas, in the case of a quadrupole configuration, there arises an equatorial ejection. In either case, the energy release is sufficient for explaining the observed average energy of supernova explosion. Neutrinos are emitted as the collapse and the formation of a rapidly rotating neutron star proceeds. In addition, neutrino radiation arises in the process of magnetorotational explosion owingmore » to additional rotational-energy losses. If the mass of a newborn neutron star exceeds the mass limit for a nonrotating neutron star, then subsequent gradual energy losses may later lead to the formation of a black hole. In that case, the energy carried away by a repeated flash of neutrino radiation increases substantially. In order to explain an interval of 4.5 hours between the two observed neutrino signals from SN 1987A, it is necessary to assume a weakening of the magnetorotional instability and a small initial magnetic field (10{sup 9}−10{sup 10} G) in the newly formed rotating neutron star. The existence of a black hole in the SN 1987A remnant could explain the absence of any visible pointlike source at the center of the explosion.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)
  2. Moscow State University, Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22761737
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physics of Atomic Nuclei
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2018 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 1063-7788
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; CONFIGURATION; DIPOLES; ENERGY LOSSES; EXPLOSIONS; INSTABILITY; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MASS; NEUTRINOS; NEUTRON STARS; QUADRUPOLES; ROTATION; SHOCK WAVES; SIGNALS; SUPERNOVAE; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S., E-mail: gkogan@iki.rssi.ru, Moiseenko, S. G., E-mail: moiseenko@iki.rssi.ru, and Ardelyan, N. V., E-mail: ardel@cs.msu.su. Magnetorotational Mechanism of the Explosion of Core-Collapse Supernovae. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063778818020035.
Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S., E-mail: gkogan@iki.rssi.ru, Moiseenko, S. G., E-mail: moiseenko@iki.rssi.ru, & Ardelyan, N. V., E-mail: ardel@cs.msu.su. Magnetorotational Mechanism of the Explosion of Core-Collapse Supernovae. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063778818020035.
Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S., E-mail: gkogan@iki.rssi.ru, Moiseenko, S. G., E-mail: moiseenko@iki.rssi.ru, and Ardelyan, N. V., E-mail: ardel@cs.msu.su. Thu . "Magnetorotational Mechanism of the Explosion of Core-Collapse Supernovae". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063778818020035.
@article{osti_22761737,
title = {Magnetorotational Mechanism of the Explosion of Core-Collapse Supernovae},
author = {Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S., E-mail: gkogan@iki.rssi.ru and Moiseenko, S. G., E-mail: moiseenko@iki.rssi.ru and Ardelyan, N. V., E-mail: ardel@cs.msu.su},
abstractNote = {The idea of the magnetorotational explosion mechanism is that the energy of rotation of the neutron star formed in the course of a collapse is transformed into the energy of an expanding shock wave by means of a magnetic field. In the two-dimensional case, the time of this transformation depends weakly on the initial strength of the poloidal magnetic field because of the development of a magnetorotational instability. Differential rotation leads to the twisting and growth of the toroidal magnetic-field component, which becomes much stronger than the poloidal component. As a result, the development of the instability and an exponential growth of all field components occur. The explosion topology depends on the structure of the magnetic field. In the case where the initial configuration of the magnetic field is close to a dipole configuration, the ejection of matter has a jet character, whereas, in the case of a quadrupole configuration, there arises an equatorial ejection. In either case, the energy release is sufficient for explaining the observed average energy of supernova explosion. Neutrinos are emitted as the collapse and the formation of a rapidly rotating neutron star proceeds. In addition, neutrino radiation arises in the process of magnetorotational explosion owing to additional rotational-energy losses. If the mass of a newborn neutron star exceeds the mass limit for a nonrotating neutron star, then subsequent gradual energy losses may later lead to the formation of a black hole. In that case, the energy carried away by a repeated flash of neutrino radiation increases substantially. In order to explain an interval of 4.5 hours between the two observed neutrino signals from SN 1987A, it is necessary to assume a weakening of the magnetorotional instability and a small initial magnetic field (10{sup 9}−10{sup 10} G) in the newly formed rotating neutron star. The existence of a black hole in the SN 1987A remnant could explain the absence of any visible pointlike source at the center of the explosion.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063778818020035},
journal = {Physics of Atomic Nuclei},
issn = {1063-7788},
number = 2,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}