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Title: High-precision measurements of the compressibility and the electrical resistivity of bulk g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa

Abstract

High-precision studies of the volume and the electrical resistivity of g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses at a high hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa at room temperature are performed. The glasses exhibit elastic behavior in compression only at a pressure up to 1 GPa, and a diffuse structural transformation and inelastic density relaxation (logarithmic in time) begin at higher pressures. When the pressure increases further, the relaxation rate passes through a sharp maximum at 2.5 GPa, which is accompanied by softening the relaxing bulk modulus, and then decreases, being noticeable up to the maximum pressure. When pressure is relieved, an unusual inflection point is observed in the baric dependence of the bulk modulus near 4 GPa. The polyamorphic transformation is only partly reversible and the residual densification after pressure release is 2%. In compression, the electrical resistivity of the g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses decreases exponentially with increasing pressure (at a pressure up to 2 GPa); then, it decreases faster by almost three orders of magnitude in the pressure range 2–3.5 GPa. At a pressure of 5 GPa, the electrical resistivity reaches 10{sup –3} Ω cm, which is characteristic of a metallic state; this resistivity continues to decrease with increasing pressure andmore » reaches 1.7 × 10{sup –4} Ω cm at 8.1 GPa. The reverse metal–semiconductor transition occurs at a pressure of 3 GPa when pressure is relieved. When the pressure is decreased to atmospheric pressure, the electrical resistivity of the glasses is below the initial pressure by two–three orders of magnitude. Under normal conditions, both the volume and the electrical resistivity relax to quasi-equilibrium values in several months. Comparative structural and Raman spectroscopy investigations demonstrate that the glasses subjected to high pressure have the maximum chemical order. The glasses with a higher order have a lower electrical resistivity. The polyamorphism in the As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses is caused by both structural changes and chemical ordering. The g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} compound is the first example of glasses, where the reversible metallization under pressure has been studied under hydrostatic conditions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)
  2. Université du Littoral, LPCA, UMR 8101 CNRS (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22756324
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 125; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 1063-7761
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE; CMS DETECTOR; COMPRESSIBILITY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GLASS; HYDROSTATICS; OPTIMAL CONTROL; PRESSURE RANGE GIGA PA; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA 10-100; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; RELAXATION; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K

Citation Formats

Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru, Bychkov, E., and Tsiok, O. B. High-precision measurements of the compressibility and the electrical resistivity of bulk g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063776117080155.
Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru, Bychkov, E., & Tsiok, O. B. High-precision measurements of the compressibility and the electrical resistivity of bulk g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776117080155.
Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru, Bychkov, E., and Tsiok, O. B. Fri . "High-precision measurements of the compressibility and the electrical resistivity of bulk g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063776117080155.
@article{osti_22756324,
title = {High-precision measurements of the compressibility and the electrical resistivity of bulk g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa},
author = {Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru and Bychkov, E. and Tsiok, O. B.},
abstractNote = {High-precision studies of the volume and the electrical resistivity of g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses at a high hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa at room temperature are performed. The glasses exhibit elastic behavior in compression only at a pressure up to 1 GPa, and a diffuse structural transformation and inelastic density relaxation (logarithmic in time) begin at higher pressures. When the pressure increases further, the relaxation rate passes through a sharp maximum at 2.5 GPa, which is accompanied by softening the relaxing bulk modulus, and then decreases, being noticeable up to the maximum pressure. When pressure is relieved, an unusual inflection point is observed in the baric dependence of the bulk modulus near 4 GPa. The polyamorphic transformation is only partly reversible and the residual densification after pressure release is 2%. In compression, the electrical resistivity of the g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses decreases exponentially with increasing pressure (at a pressure up to 2 GPa); then, it decreases faster by almost three orders of magnitude in the pressure range 2–3.5 GPa. At a pressure of 5 GPa, the electrical resistivity reaches 10{sup –3} Ω cm, which is characteristic of a metallic state; this resistivity continues to decrease with increasing pressure and reaches 1.7 × 10{sup –4} Ω cm at 8.1 GPa. The reverse metal–semiconductor transition occurs at a pressure of 3 GPa when pressure is relieved. When the pressure is decreased to atmospheric pressure, the electrical resistivity of the glasses is below the initial pressure by two–three orders of magnitude. Under normal conditions, both the volume and the electrical resistivity relax to quasi-equilibrium values in several months. Comparative structural and Raman spectroscopy investigations demonstrate that the glasses subjected to high pressure have the maximum chemical order. The glasses with a higher order have a lower electrical resistivity. The polyamorphism in the As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses is caused by both structural changes and chemical ordering. The g-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} compound is the first example of glasses, where the reversible metallization under pressure has been studied under hydrostatic conditions.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063776117080155},
journal = {Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics},
issn = {1063-7761},
number = 3,
volume = 125,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}