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Title: Cost-effective treatment of swine wastes through recovery of energy and nutrients

Abstract

Highlights: • Cost-effective swine waste treatment that recovers energy/nutrients was evaluated. • Ion exchange and struvite precipitation were considered for nutrient recovery. • Generally, more than 90% of N, P, and K{sup +} nutrients were recovered. • Life Cycle Cost Analysis was performed, showing significant advantages. - Abstract: Wastes from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are challenging to treat because they are high in organic matter and nutrients. Conventional swine waste treatment options in the U.S., such as uncovered anaerobic lagoons, result in poor effluent quality and greenhouse gas emissions, and implementation of advanced treatment introduces high costs. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance and life cycle costs of an alternative system for treating swine CAFO waste, which recovers valuable energy (as biogas) and nutrients (N, P, K{sup +}) as saleable fertilizers. The system uses in-vessel anaerobic digestion (AD) for methane production and solids stabilization, followed by struvite precipitation and ion exchange (IX) onto natural zeolites (chabazite or clinoptilolite) for nutrient recovery. An alternative approach that integrated struvite recovery and IX into a single reactor, termed STRIEX, was also investigated. Pilot- and bench-scale reactor experiments were used to evaluate the performance of each stage inmore » the treatment train. Data from these studies were integrated into a life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to assess the cost-effectiveness of various process alternatives. Significant improvement in water quality, high methane production, and high nutrient recovery (generally over 90%) were observed with both the AD-struvite-IX process and the AD-STRIEX process. The LCCA showed that the STRIEX system can provide considerable financial savings compared to conventional systems. AD, however, incurs high capital costs compared to conventional anaerobic lagoons and may require larger scales to become financially attractive.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave ENB 118, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)
  2. Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22742183
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Waste Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 69; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0956-053X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ANAEROBIC DIGESTION; ION EXCHANGE; LIFE-CYCLE COST; METHANE; NUTRIENTS; PERFORMANCE; WASTES

Citation Formats

Amini, Adib, Aponte-Morales, Veronica, Wang, Meng, Dilbeck, Merrill, Lahav, Ori, Zhang, Qiong, Cunningham, Jeffrey A., E-mail: cunning@usf.edu, and Ergas, Sarina J., E-mail: sergas@usf.edu. Cost-effective treatment of swine wastes through recovery of energy and nutrients. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.041.
Amini, Adib, Aponte-Morales, Veronica, Wang, Meng, Dilbeck, Merrill, Lahav, Ori, Zhang, Qiong, Cunningham, Jeffrey A., E-mail: cunning@usf.edu, & Ergas, Sarina J., E-mail: sergas@usf.edu. Cost-effective treatment of swine wastes through recovery of energy and nutrients. United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.041.
Amini, Adib, Aponte-Morales, Veronica, Wang, Meng, Dilbeck, Merrill, Lahav, Ori, Zhang, Qiong, Cunningham, Jeffrey A., E-mail: cunning@usf.edu, and Ergas, Sarina J., E-mail: sergas@usf.edu. Wed . "Cost-effective treatment of swine wastes through recovery of energy and nutrients". United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.041.
@article{osti_22742183,
title = {Cost-effective treatment of swine wastes through recovery of energy and nutrients},
author = {Amini, Adib and Aponte-Morales, Veronica and Wang, Meng and Dilbeck, Merrill and Lahav, Ori and Zhang, Qiong and Cunningham, Jeffrey A., E-mail: cunning@usf.edu and Ergas, Sarina J., E-mail: sergas@usf.edu},
abstractNote = {Highlights: • Cost-effective swine waste treatment that recovers energy/nutrients was evaluated. • Ion exchange and struvite precipitation were considered for nutrient recovery. • Generally, more than 90% of N, P, and K{sup +} nutrients were recovered. • Life Cycle Cost Analysis was performed, showing significant advantages. - Abstract: Wastes from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are challenging to treat because they are high in organic matter and nutrients. Conventional swine waste treatment options in the U.S., such as uncovered anaerobic lagoons, result in poor effluent quality and greenhouse gas emissions, and implementation of advanced treatment introduces high costs. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance and life cycle costs of an alternative system for treating swine CAFO waste, which recovers valuable energy (as biogas) and nutrients (N, P, K{sup +}) as saleable fertilizers. The system uses in-vessel anaerobic digestion (AD) for methane production and solids stabilization, followed by struvite precipitation and ion exchange (IX) onto natural zeolites (chabazite or clinoptilolite) for nutrient recovery. An alternative approach that integrated struvite recovery and IX into a single reactor, termed STRIEX, was also investigated. Pilot- and bench-scale reactor experiments were used to evaluate the performance of each stage in the treatment train. Data from these studies were integrated into a life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to assess the cost-effectiveness of various process alternatives. Significant improvement in water quality, high methane production, and high nutrient recovery (generally over 90%) were observed with both the AD-struvite-IX process and the AD-STRIEX process. The LCCA showed that the STRIEX system can provide considerable financial savings compared to conventional systems. AD, however, incurs high capital costs compared to conventional anaerobic lagoons and may require larger scales to become financially attractive.},
doi = {10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.041},
journal = {Waste Management},
issn = {0956-053X},
number = ,
volume = 69,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}