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Title: Effect of a food waste disposer policy on solid waste and wastewater management with economic implications of environmental externalities

Abstract

Highlights: • Integrating food waste disposers in waste management systems. • Emissions reduction can reach ∼42% depending on tested scenarios. • Economic gains can reach ∼28% including environmental externalities. • Variation in cost of sludge management exhibit a significant impact on savings. - Abstract: In this study, the carbon footprint of introducing a food waste disposer (FWD) policy was examined in the context of its implications on solid waste and wastewater management with economic assessment of environmental externalities emphasizing potential carbon credit and increased sludge generation. For this purpose, a model adopting a life cycle inventory approach was developed to integrate solid waste and wastewater management processes under a single framework and test scenarios for a waste with high organic food content typical of developing economies. For such a waste composition, the results show that a FWD policy can reduce emissions by nearly ∼42% depending on market penetration, fraction of food waste ground, as well as solid waste and wastewater management schemes, including potential energy recovery. In comparison to baseline, equivalent economic gains can reach ∼28% when environmental externalities including sludge management and emissions variations are considered. The sensitivity analyses on processes with a wide range in costs showed anmore » equivalent economic impact thus emphasizing the viability of a FWD policy although the variation in the cost of sludge management exhibited a significant impact on savings.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22742182
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Waste Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 69; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0956-053X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; CARBON FOOTPRINT; EMISSION; FOOD; LIFE CYCLE; SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS; SLUDGES; SOLID WASTES; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE WATER

Citation Formats

Maalouf, Amani, and El-Fadel, Mutasem. Effect of a food waste disposer policy on solid waste and wastewater management with economic implications of environmental externalities. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.008.
Maalouf, Amani, & El-Fadel, Mutasem. Effect of a food waste disposer policy on solid waste and wastewater management with economic implications of environmental externalities. United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.008.
Maalouf, Amani, and El-Fadel, Mutasem. Wed . "Effect of a food waste disposer policy on solid waste and wastewater management with economic implications of environmental externalities". United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.008.
@article{osti_22742182,
title = {Effect of a food waste disposer policy on solid waste and wastewater management with economic implications of environmental externalities},
author = {Maalouf, Amani and El-Fadel, Mutasem},
abstractNote = {Highlights: • Integrating food waste disposers in waste management systems. • Emissions reduction can reach ∼42% depending on tested scenarios. • Economic gains can reach ∼28% including environmental externalities. • Variation in cost of sludge management exhibit a significant impact on savings. - Abstract: In this study, the carbon footprint of introducing a food waste disposer (FWD) policy was examined in the context of its implications on solid waste and wastewater management with economic assessment of environmental externalities emphasizing potential carbon credit and increased sludge generation. For this purpose, a model adopting a life cycle inventory approach was developed to integrate solid waste and wastewater management processes under a single framework and test scenarios for a waste with high organic food content typical of developing economies. For such a waste composition, the results show that a FWD policy can reduce emissions by nearly ∼42% depending on market penetration, fraction of food waste ground, as well as solid waste and wastewater management schemes, including potential energy recovery. In comparison to baseline, equivalent economic gains can reach ∼28% when environmental externalities including sludge management and emissions variations are considered. The sensitivity analyses on processes with a wide range in costs showed an equivalent economic impact thus emphasizing the viability of a FWD policy although the variation in the cost of sludge management exhibited a significant impact on savings.},
doi = {10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.08.008},
journal = {Waste Management},
issn = {0956-053X},
number = ,
volume = 69,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}