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Title: Sex-specific effects of developmental lead exposure on the immune-neuroendocrine network

Abstract

The environmental toxicant lead (Pb) has long been known to induce neurological deficits. The 1st century Greek physician Pedanius Dioscorides noted that “lead makes the mind give way”. Current studies are suggesting the effects of Pb on behaviors may involve the immune system and conversely some immunomodulatory changes may be due to Pb effects in the central nervous system. Although Pb-induced disorders do not appear to discriminate among females and males, this report discusses the differences observed in human and animal studies regarding differential gender effects on gene expression after Pb exposure. The overall ill health outcomes are apparent with variant levels of Pb exposure and exposures at different times in development. However, the consensus is that doses leading to blood lead levels > 5 μg/dl and prenatal exposures are most pathogenic. Although the general detriments induced by Pb may be similar in females and males, there are sex specific outcomes on health and behavior. It is suggested that Pb induces more oxidative stress in females and more upregulation of genes responding to oxidative stress, while males have more proteolytic destruction; but in both cases, there is generation of altered/denatured self-constituents causing inflammation and loss of homeostasis of neuronal andmore » immune functions. The higher estrogen levels of females are indicated as the reason for more Pb-induced reactive oxygen species in females. This review describes some of the different genes involved in female and male responses to Pb exposure and involved pathways.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health University at Albany School of Public Health, Albany, NY (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22722951
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 334; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0041-008X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; FEMALES; GENES; PRENATAL EXPOSURE

Citation Formats

Kasten-Jolly, Jane, Lawrence, David A., E-mail: david.lawrence@health.ny.gov, and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University at Albany School of Public Health, Albany, NY. Sex-specific effects of developmental lead exposure on the immune-neuroendocrine network. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2017.09.009.
Kasten-Jolly, Jane, Lawrence, David A., E-mail: david.lawrence@health.ny.gov, & Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University at Albany School of Public Health, Albany, NY. Sex-specific effects of developmental lead exposure on the immune-neuroendocrine network. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2017.09.009.
Kasten-Jolly, Jane, Lawrence, David A., E-mail: david.lawrence@health.ny.gov, and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University at Albany School of Public Health, Albany, NY. Wed . "Sex-specific effects of developmental lead exposure on the immune-neuroendocrine network". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2017.09.009.
@article{osti_22722951,
title = {Sex-specific effects of developmental lead exposure on the immune-neuroendocrine network},
author = {Kasten-Jolly, Jane and Lawrence, David A., E-mail: david.lawrence@health.ny.gov and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University at Albany School of Public Health, Albany, NY},
abstractNote = {The environmental toxicant lead (Pb) has long been known to induce neurological deficits. The 1st century Greek physician Pedanius Dioscorides noted that “lead makes the mind give way”. Current studies are suggesting the effects of Pb on behaviors may involve the immune system and conversely some immunomodulatory changes may be due to Pb effects in the central nervous system. Although Pb-induced disorders do not appear to discriminate among females and males, this report discusses the differences observed in human and animal studies regarding differential gender effects on gene expression after Pb exposure. The overall ill health outcomes are apparent with variant levels of Pb exposure and exposures at different times in development. However, the consensus is that doses leading to blood lead levels > 5 μg/dl and prenatal exposures are most pathogenic. Although the general detriments induced by Pb may be similar in females and males, there are sex specific outcomes on health and behavior. It is suggested that Pb induces more oxidative stress in females and more upregulation of genes responding to oxidative stress, while males have more proteolytic destruction; but in both cases, there is generation of altered/denatured self-constituents causing inflammation and loss of homeostasis of neuronal and immune functions. The higher estrogen levels of females are indicated as the reason for more Pb-induced reactive oxygen species in females. This review describes some of the different genes involved in female and male responses to Pb exposure and involved pathways.},
doi = {10.1016/J.TAAP.2017.09.009},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
issn = {0041-008X},
number = ,
volume = 334,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}