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Title: Assessing the urban carbon footprint: An overview

Abstract

All cities present environmental sustainability issues, above all regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and specifically carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), that directly affect climate change. Consequently, it is very important to quantify and report their Carbon Footprint (CF) for implementing national and international policies/strategies aimed at mitigating and adapting these concerns. The Urban Carbon Footprint (UCF), indeed, has been recognized as the more valuable choice to inform, specifically, decision makers about city environmental sustainability. Several accounting systems and inventory methods have been taken into account to perform UCF, highlighting the complexity of the topic and generating very often confusion among users. In this context, the authors aim to summarize what has been done and what is going on with UCFs, trying to classify them according to some principal dimensions. Thus, they divide UFCs in two main categories namely: “spatial” or “direct”, with a limited amount of data requested, and “economic” or “life cycle based”, more or less data inclusive according to the accounting systems considered. Furthermore, they observe that there is not a “global agreed-upon protocol” yet, neither is there a specific model shared among researchers, even if some steps have been made towards this direction (Relative Carbon Footprint - RCF,more » Publicly Available Specification – PAS 2070 and Global Protocol for Community scale - GPC). Consequently, it is necessary to complete and standardize, in the short term, the accounting and reporting frameworks, in order to compare different UCFs for adopting shared climate strategies and actions at global level. - Highlights: •Cities present environmental sustainability issues. •GHG emissions - specifically carbon dioxide - directly affect climate change. •UCF is a tool to support policy makers towards city environmental sustainability. •There is not a “global agreed-upon protocol” to perform UFC. •There are still missing points to be considered to provide a sharing model.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22701670
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Impact Assessment Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 66; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0195-9255
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ACCOUNTING; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON FOOTPRINT; CLIMATES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; GLOBAL ASPECTS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; GREENHOUSE GASES; HABITAT; LAND USE; SUSTAINABILITY; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; URBAN AREAS

Citation Formats

Lombardi, Mariarosaria, Laiola, Elisabetta, Tricase, Caterina, and Rana, Roberto. Assessing the urban carbon footprint: An overview. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2017.06.005.
Lombardi, Mariarosaria, Laiola, Elisabetta, Tricase, Caterina, & Rana, Roberto. Assessing the urban carbon footprint: An overview. United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2017.06.005.
Lombardi, Mariarosaria, Laiola, Elisabetta, Tricase, Caterina, and Rana, Roberto. Fri . "Assessing the urban carbon footprint: An overview". United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2017.06.005.
@article{osti_22701670,
title = {Assessing the urban carbon footprint: An overview},
author = {Lombardi, Mariarosaria and Laiola, Elisabetta and Tricase, Caterina and Rana, Roberto},
abstractNote = {All cities present environmental sustainability issues, above all regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and specifically carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), that directly affect climate change. Consequently, it is very important to quantify and report their Carbon Footprint (CF) for implementing national and international policies/strategies aimed at mitigating and adapting these concerns. The Urban Carbon Footprint (UCF), indeed, has been recognized as the more valuable choice to inform, specifically, decision makers about city environmental sustainability. Several accounting systems and inventory methods have been taken into account to perform UCF, highlighting the complexity of the topic and generating very often confusion among users. In this context, the authors aim to summarize what has been done and what is going on with UCFs, trying to classify them according to some principal dimensions. Thus, they divide UFCs in two main categories namely: “spatial” or “direct”, with a limited amount of data requested, and “economic” or “life cycle based”, more or less data inclusive according to the accounting systems considered. Furthermore, they observe that there is not a “global agreed-upon protocol” yet, neither is there a specific model shared among researchers, even if some steps have been made towards this direction (Relative Carbon Footprint - RCF, Publicly Available Specification – PAS 2070 and Global Protocol for Community scale - GPC). Consequently, it is necessary to complete and standardize, in the short term, the accounting and reporting frameworks, in order to compare different UCFs for adopting shared climate strategies and actions at global level. - Highlights: •Cities present environmental sustainability issues. •GHG emissions - specifically carbon dioxide - directly affect climate change. •UCF is a tool to support policy makers towards city environmental sustainability. •There is not a “global agreed-upon protocol” to perform UFC. •There are still missing points to be considered to provide a sharing model.},
doi = {10.1016/J.EIAR.2017.06.005},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
issn = {0195-9255},
number = ,
volume = 66,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}