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Title: 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup

Abstract

Extensive first-pass metabolism of ingested bisphenol A (BPA) in the gastro-intestinal tract and liver restricts blood concentrations of bioactive BPA to < 1% of total BPA in humans and non-human primates. Absorption of ingested BPA through non-metabolizing tissues of the oral cavity, recently demonstrated in dogs, could lead to the higher serum BPA concentrations reported in some human biomonitoring studies. We hypothesized that the extensive interaction with the oral mucosa by a liquid matrix, like soup, relative to solid food or capsules, might enhance absorption through non-metabolizing oral cavity tissues in humans, producing higher bioavailability and higher serum BPA concentrations. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 hour period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. Absorption of d6-BPA was rapid (t{sub 1/2} = 0.45 h) and elimination of the administered dose was complete 24 h post-ingestion, evidence against any tissue depot for BPA. The maximum serum d6-BPA concentration was 0.43 nM at 1.6 h after administration and represented < 0.3% of total d6-BPA. Pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacokinetic model simulations, and the significantly faster appearance half-life of d6-BPA-glucuronide compared to d6-BPA (0.29more » h vs 0.45 h) were evidence against meaningful absorption of BPA in humans through any non-metabolizing tissue (< 1%). This study confirms that typical exposure to BPA in food produces picomolar to subpicomolar serum BPA concentrations in humans, not nM concentrations reported in some biomonitoring studies.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [3]
  1. Health Effects and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)
  4. Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22687774
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 288; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABSORPTION; ABUNDANCE; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; BLOOD; CONCENTRATION RATIO; DOGS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; FOOD; HALF-LIFE; INGESTION; LIVER; MUCOUS MEMBRANES; ORAL CAVITY; SULFATES; URINE

Citation Formats

Teeguarden, Justin G., E-mail: jt@pnl.gov, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 93771, Twaddle, Nathan C., E-mail: nathan.twaddle@fda.hhs.gov, Churchwell, Mona I., E-mail: mona.churchwell@fda.hhs.gov, Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: xiaoxia.yang@fda.hhs.gov, Fisher, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jeffrey.fisher@fda.hhs.gov, Seryak, Liesel M., E-mail: seryak.2@osu.edu, and Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2015.01.009.
Teeguarden, Justin G., E-mail: jt@pnl.gov, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 93771, Twaddle, Nathan C., E-mail: nathan.twaddle@fda.hhs.gov, Churchwell, Mona I., E-mail: mona.churchwell@fda.hhs.gov, Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: xiaoxia.yang@fda.hhs.gov, Fisher, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jeffrey.fisher@fda.hhs.gov, Seryak, Liesel M., E-mail: seryak.2@osu.edu, & Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2015.01.009.
Teeguarden, Justin G., E-mail: jt@pnl.gov, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 93771, Twaddle, Nathan C., E-mail: nathan.twaddle@fda.hhs.gov, Churchwell, Mona I., E-mail: mona.churchwell@fda.hhs.gov, Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: xiaoxia.yang@fda.hhs.gov, Fisher, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jeffrey.fisher@fda.hhs.gov, Seryak, Liesel M., E-mail: seryak.2@osu.edu, and Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov. Thu . "24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2015.01.009.
@article{osti_22687774,
title = {24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup},
author = {Teeguarden, Justin G., E-mail: jt@pnl.gov and Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 93771 and Twaddle, Nathan C., E-mail: nathan.twaddle@fda.hhs.gov and Churchwell, Mona I., E-mail: mona.churchwell@fda.hhs.gov and Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: xiaoxia.yang@fda.hhs.gov and Fisher, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jeffrey.fisher@fda.hhs.gov and Seryak, Liesel M., E-mail: seryak.2@osu.edu and Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov},
abstractNote = {Extensive first-pass metabolism of ingested bisphenol A (BPA) in the gastro-intestinal tract and liver restricts blood concentrations of bioactive BPA to < 1% of total BPA in humans and non-human primates. Absorption of ingested BPA through non-metabolizing tissues of the oral cavity, recently demonstrated in dogs, could lead to the higher serum BPA concentrations reported in some human biomonitoring studies. We hypothesized that the extensive interaction with the oral mucosa by a liquid matrix, like soup, relative to solid food or capsules, might enhance absorption through non-metabolizing oral cavity tissues in humans, producing higher bioavailability and higher serum BPA concentrations. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 hour period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. Absorption of d6-BPA was rapid (t{sub 1/2} = 0.45 h) and elimination of the administered dose was complete 24 h post-ingestion, evidence against any tissue depot for BPA. The maximum serum d6-BPA concentration was 0.43 nM at 1.6 h after administration and represented < 0.3% of total d6-BPA. Pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacokinetic model simulations, and the significantly faster appearance half-life of d6-BPA-glucuronide compared to d6-BPA (0.29 h vs 0.45 h) were evidence against meaningful absorption of BPA in humans through any non-metabolizing tissue (< 1%). This study confirms that typical exposure to BPA in food produces picomolar to subpicomolar serum BPA concentrations in humans, not nM concentrations reported in some biomonitoring studies.},
doi = {10.1016/J.TAAP.2015.01.009},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2,
volume = 288,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Oct 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Thu Oct 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}