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Title: Latitudinal exposure to DDTs, HCB, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in giant petrels (Macronectes spp.) across the Southern Ocean

Abstract

Studies on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic wildlife are scarce, and usually limited to a single locality. As a result, wildlife exposure to POPs across the Southern Ocean is poorly understood. In this study, we report the differential exposure of the major southern ocean scavengers, the giant petrels, to POPs across a wide latitudinal gradient. Selected POPs (PCBs, HCB, DDTs, PBDEs) and related compounds, such as Dechlorane Plus (DP), were analyzed in plasma of southern giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus) breeding on Livingston (62°S 61°W, Antarctica), Marion (46°S 37°E, sub-Antarctic), and Gough (40°S 10°W, cool temperate) islands. Northern giant petrels (Macronectes halli) from Marion Island were also studied. Stable isotope ratios of C and N (δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N) were used as dietary tracers of the marine habitat and trophic level, respectively. Breeding locality was a major factor explaining petrel exposure to POPs compared with species and sex. Significant relationships between δ{sup 13}C values and POP burdens, at both inter- and intra-population levels, support latitudinal variations in feeding grounds as a key factor in explaining petrel pollutant burdens. Overall, pollutant levels in giant petrels decreased significantly with latitude, but the relative abundance (%) of the more volatile POPs increasedmore » towards Antarctica. DP was found at negligible levels compared with legacy POPs in Antarctic seabirds. Spatial POP patterns found in giant petrels match those predicted by global distribution models, and reinforce the hypothesis of atmospheric long-range transport as the main source of POPs in Antarctica. Our results confirm that wildlife movements out of the polar region markedly increase their exposure to POPs. Therefore, strategies for Antarctic wildlife conservation should consider spatial heterogeneity in exposure to marine pollution. Of particular relevance is the need to clarify the exposure of Antarctic predators to emerging contaminants that are not yet globally regulated. - Highlights: • Latitude of petrels' foraging areas explains their exposure to legacy and emerging POPs. • Spatial patterns of POPs in giant petrels across the Southern Ocean are congener-dependent. • Overall POP burdens in giant petrels decrease southwards across the Southern Ocean. • Latitudinal patterns of POP in giant petrels agree with global distribution models. • POP patterns in giant petrels suggest long-range transport as their main source.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Instrumental Analysis and Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Organic Chemistry, CSIC (IQOG-CSIC), Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)
  2. Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat (IRBio) and Department of Animal Biology, Universitat de Barcelona, Av Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)
  3. Percy FitzPatrick Institute, DST-NRF Centre of Excellence, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22687748
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 148; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0013-9351
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DDT; ISOTOPE RATIO; LONG-RANGE TRANSPORT; POLLUTANTS; POLLUTION; POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS; SEAS; STABLE ISOTOPES; WILD ANIMALS

Citation Formats

Roscales, Jose L., E-mail: jlroscales@iqog.csic.es, González-Solís, Jacob, Zango, Laura, Ryan, Peter G., and Jiménez, Begoña. Latitudinal exposure to DDTs, HCB, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in giant petrels (Macronectes spp.) across the Southern Ocean. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.ENVRES.2016.04.005.
Roscales, Jose L., E-mail: jlroscales@iqog.csic.es, González-Solís, Jacob, Zango, Laura, Ryan, Peter G., & Jiménez, Begoña. Latitudinal exposure to DDTs, HCB, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in giant petrels (Macronectes spp.) across the Southern Ocean. United States. doi:10.1016/J.ENVRES.2016.04.005.
Roscales, Jose L., E-mail: jlroscales@iqog.csic.es, González-Solís, Jacob, Zango, Laura, Ryan, Peter G., and Jiménez, Begoña. Fri . "Latitudinal exposure to DDTs, HCB, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in giant petrels (Macronectes spp.) across the Southern Ocean". United States. doi:10.1016/J.ENVRES.2016.04.005.
@article{osti_22687748,
title = {Latitudinal exposure to DDTs, HCB, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in giant petrels (Macronectes spp.) across the Southern Ocean},
author = {Roscales, Jose L., E-mail: jlroscales@iqog.csic.es and González-Solís, Jacob and Zango, Laura and Ryan, Peter G. and Jiménez, Begoña},
abstractNote = {Studies on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic wildlife are scarce, and usually limited to a single locality. As a result, wildlife exposure to POPs across the Southern Ocean is poorly understood. In this study, we report the differential exposure of the major southern ocean scavengers, the giant petrels, to POPs across a wide latitudinal gradient. Selected POPs (PCBs, HCB, DDTs, PBDEs) and related compounds, such as Dechlorane Plus (DP), were analyzed in plasma of southern giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus) breeding on Livingston (62°S 61°W, Antarctica), Marion (46°S 37°E, sub-Antarctic), and Gough (40°S 10°W, cool temperate) islands. Northern giant petrels (Macronectes halli) from Marion Island were also studied. Stable isotope ratios of C and N (δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N) were used as dietary tracers of the marine habitat and trophic level, respectively. Breeding locality was a major factor explaining petrel exposure to POPs compared with species and sex. Significant relationships between δ{sup 13}C values and POP burdens, at both inter- and intra-population levels, support latitudinal variations in feeding grounds as a key factor in explaining petrel pollutant burdens. Overall, pollutant levels in giant petrels decreased significantly with latitude, but the relative abundance (%) of the more volatile POPs increased towards Antarctica. DP was found at negligible levels compared with legacy POPs in Antarctic seabirds. Spatial POP patterns found in giant petrels match those predicted by global distribution models, and reinforce the hypothesis of atmospheric long-range transport as the main source of POPs in Antarctica. Our results confirm that wildlife movements out of the polar region markedly increase their exposure to POPs. Therefore, strategies for Antarctic wildlife conservation should consider spatial heterogeneity in exposure to marine pollution. Of particular relevance is the need to clarify the exposure of Antarctic predators to emerging contaminants that are not yet globally regulated. - Highlights: • Latitude of petrels' foraging areas explains their exposure to legacy and emerging POPs. • Spatial patterns of POPs in giant petrels across the Southern Ocean are congener-dependent. • Overall POP burdens in giant petrels decrease southwards across the Southern Ocean. • Latitudinal patterns of POP in giant petrels agree with global distribution models. • POP patterns in giant petrels suggest long-range transport as their main source.},
doi = {10.1016/J.ENVRES.2016.04.005},
journal = {Environmental Research},
issn = {0013-9351},
number = ,
volume = 148,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {7}
}