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Title: Targeting accuracy of single-isocenter intensity-modulated radiosurgery for multiple lesions

Abstract

To investigate the targeting accuracy of intensity-modulated SRS (IMRS) plans designed to simultaneously treat multiple brain metastases with a single isocenter. A home-made acrylic phantom able to support a film (EBT3) in its coronal plane was used. The phantom was CT scanned and three coplanar small targets (a central and two peripheral) were outlined in the Eclipse system. Peripheral targets were 6 cm apart from the central one. A reference IMRS plan was designed to simultaneously treat the three targets, but only a single isocenter located at the center of the central target was used. After positioning the phantom on the linac using the room lasers, a CBCT scan was acquired and the reference plan were mapped on it, by placing the planned isocenter at the intersection of the landmarks used in the film showing the linac isocenter. The mapped plan was then recalculated and delivered. The film dose distribution was derived using a cloud computing application ( (www.radiochromic.com)) that uses a triple-channel dosimetry algorithm. Comparison of dose distributions using the gamma index (5%/1 mm) were performed over a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} region centered over each target. 2D shifts required to get the best gamma passing rates onmore » the peripheral target regions were compared with the reported ones for the central target. The experiment was repeated ten times in different sessions. Average 2D shifts required to achieve optimal gamma passing rates (99%, 97%, 99%) were 0.7 mm (SD: 0.3 mm), 0.8 mm (SD: 0.4 mm) and 0.8 mm (SD: 0.3 mm), for the central and the two peripheral targets, respectively. No statistical differences (p > 0.05) were found for targeting accuracy between the central and the two peripheral targets. The study revealed a targeting accuracy within 1 mm for off-isocenter targets within 6 cm of the linac isocenter, when a single-isocenter IMRS plan is designed.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22685190
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; BRAIN; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSIMETRY; LASERS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; METASTASES; PHANTOMS; POSITIONING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Calvo-Ortega, J.F., E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es, Pozo, M., Moragues, S., and Casals, J. Targeting accuracy of single-isocenter intensity-modulated radiosurgery for multiple lesions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2017.01.006.
Calvo-Ortega, J.F., E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es, Pozo, M., Moragues, S., & Casals, J. Targeting accuracy of single-isocenter intensity-modulated radiosurgery for multiple lesions. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2017.01.006.
Calvo-Ortega, J.F., E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es, Pozo, M., Moragues, S., and Casals, J. Sat . "Targeting accuracy of single-isocenter intensity-modulated radiosurgery for multiple lesions". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2017.01.006.
@article{osti_22685190,
title = {Targeting accuracy of single-isocenter intensity-modulated radiosurgery for multiple lesions},
author = {Calvo-Ortega, J.F., E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es and Pozo, M. and Moragues, S. and Casals, J.},
abstractNote = {To investigate the targeting accuracy of intensity-modulated SRS (IMRS) plans designed to simultaneously treat multiple brain metastases with a single isocenter. A home-made acrylic phantom able to support a film (EBT3) in its coronal plane was used. The phantom was CT scanned and three coplanar small targets (a central and two peripheral) were outlined in the Eclipse system. Peripheral targets were 6 cm apart from the central one. A reference IMRS plan was designed to simultaneously treat the three targets, but only a single isocenter located at the center of the central target was used. After positioning the phantom on the linac using the room lasers, a CBCT scan was acquired and the reference plan were mapped on it, by placing the planned isocenter at the intersection of the landmarks used in the film showing the linac isocenter. The mapped plan was then recalculated and delivered. The film dose distribution was derived using a cloud computing application ( (www.radiochromic.com)) that uses a triple-channel dosimetry algorithm. Comparison of dose distributions using the gamma index (5%/1 mm) were performed over a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} region centered over each target. 2D shifts required to get the best gamma passing rates on the peripheral target regions were compared with the reported ones for the central target. The experiment was repeated ten times in different sessions. Average 2D shifts required to achieve optimal gamma passing rates (99%, 97%, 99%) were 0.7 mm (SD: 0.3 mm), 0.8 mm (SD: 0.4 mm) and 0.8 mm (SD: 0.3 mm), for the central and the two peripheral targets, respectively. No statistical differences (p > 0.05) were found for targeting accuracy between the central and the two peripheral targets. The study revealed a targeting accuracy within 1 mm for off-isocenter targets within 6 cm of the linac isocenter, when a single-isocenter IMRS plan is designed.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2017.01.006},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 2,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To describe our clinical experience using a unique single-isocenter technique for frameless intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IM-SRS) to treat multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with a median of 5 metastases (range, 2-13) underwent optically guided frameless IM-SRS using a single, centrally located isocenter. Median prescription dose was 18 Gy (range, 14-25). Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical examination occurred every 2-4 months. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 3.3 months (range, 0.2-21.3), with 20 of 26 patients (77%) followed up until their death. For the remaining 6 patients alive at the time of analysis, medianmore » follow-up was 14.6 months (range, 9.3-18.0). Total treatment time ranged from 9.0 to 38.9 minutes (median, 21.0). Actuarial 6- and 12-month overall survivals were 50% (95% confidence interval [C.I.], 31-70%) and 38% (95% C.I., 19-56%), respectively. Actuarial 6- and 12-month local control (LC) rates were 97% (95% C.I., 93-100%) and 83% (95% C.I., 71-96%), respectively. Tumors {<=}1.5 cm had a better 6-month LC than those >1.5 cm (98% vs. 90%, p = 0.008). New intracranial metastatic disease occurring outside of the treatment volume was observed in 7 patients. Grade {>=}3 toxicity occurred in 2 patients (8%). Conclusion: Frameless IM-SRS using a single-isocenter approach for treating multiple intracranial metastases can produce clinical outcomes that compare favorably with those of conventional SRS in a much shorter treatment time (<40 minutes). Given its faster treatment time, this technique is appealing to both patients and personnel in busy clinics.« less
  • Purpose: Evaluating the dosimetric-impact on multiple-targets placed away from the isocenter-target with varying rotational-error introduced by initial setup uncertainty and/or intrafractional-movement Methods: CyberKnife-Phantom was scanned with the Intracranial SRS-protocol of 1.25mm slice-thickness and the multiple-targets(GTV) of 1mm and 10mm in diameter were contoured on the Eclipse. PTV for distal-target only was drawn with 1mm expansion around the GTV to find out how much margin is needed to compensate for the rotational-error. The separation between the isocenter-target and distal-target was varied from 3cm to 7cm. RapidArc-based IMRS plans of 16Gy single-fraction were generated with five non-coplanar arcs by using Varian TrueBeam-STxmore » equipped with high resolution MLC leaves of 2.5mm at center and with dose-rate of 1400MU/min at 6MV for flatteringfilter- free(FFF). An identical CT image with intentionally introduced 1° rotational-error was registered with the planning CT image, and the isodose distribution and Dose-Volume-Histogram(DVH) were compared with the original plans. Additionally, the dosimetric-impact of rotational error was evaluated with that of 6X photon energy which was generated with the same target-coverage. Results: For the 1mm-target with 6X-FFF, PTV-coverage(D100) of the distal-target with 1° rotational-error decreased from 1.00 to 0.35 as the separation between isocenter-target and distal-target increased from 3cm to 7cm. However, GTV-coverage(D100) was 1.0 except that of 7cm-separation(0.55), which resulted from the 1mm-margin around the distal-target. For 6X photon, GTV-coverage remained at 1.0 regardless of the separation of targets, showing that the dosimetric-impact of rotational error depends on the degree of rotational-error, separation of targets, and dose distribution around targets. For 10mm-target, PTV-coverage of distaltarget located 3cm-away was better than that of 1mm-target(0.93 versus 0.7) and GTV-coverage was 1.0 regardless of 6X-FFF/6X photon beams. Conclusion: RapidArc-based Multiple-target IMRS may Resultin a compromised outcome due to the setup-error for distal-targets. With 1mm-margin, GTV-coverage of distal-target was 1.0 although the separation of targets was up to 5cm.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the relative plan quality of single-isocenter vs. multi-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for radiosurgical treatment of multiple central nervous system metastases. Methods and Materials: VMAT plans were created using RapidArc technology for treatment of simulated patients with three brain metastases. The plans consisted of single-arc/single-isocenter, triple-arc (noncoplanar)/single-isocenter, and triple-arc (coplanar)/triple-isocenter configurations. All VMAT plans were normalized to deliver 100% of the 20-Gy prescription dose to all lesions. The plans were evaluated by calculation of Paddick and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index scores, Paddick gradient index scores, and 12-Gy isodose volumes. Results: All plans were judgedmore » clinically acceptable, but differences were observed in the dosimetric parameters, with the use of multiple noncoplanar arcs showing small improvements in the conformity indexes compared with the single-arc/single-isocenter and triple-arc (coplanar)/triple-isocenter plans. Multiple arc plans (triple-arc [noncoplanar]/single-isocenter and triple-arc [coplanar]/triple-isocenter) showed smaller 12-Gy isodose volumes in scenarios involving three metastases spaced closely together, with only small differences noted among all plans involving lesions spaced further apart. Conclusion: Our initial results suggest that single-isocenter VMAT plans can be used to deliver conformity equivalent to that of multiple isocenter VMAT techniques. For targets that are closely spaced, multiple noncoplanar single-isocenter arcs might be required. VMAT radiosurgery for multiple targets using a single isocenter can be efficiently delivered, requiring less than one-half the beam time required for multiple isocenter set ups. VMAT radiosurgery will likely replace multi-isocenter techniques for linear accelerator-based treatment of multiple targets.« less
  • Purpose: This study evaluates a novel algorithm that can be used with any treatment planning system for simple and rapid generation of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) plans for treating multiple brain metastases using a single isocenter dynamic conformal arc (DCA) approach. This technique is compared with a single isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique in terms of delivery time, conformity, low dose spread and delivery accuracy. Methods: Five patients, with a total of 37 (5 – 11) targets were planned using a previously published method for generating optimal VMAT plans and using the proposed DCA algorithm. All planning target volumesmore » (PTVs) were planned to 20 Gy, meeting a minimum 99% coverage and maximum 135 % hot spot for both techniques. Quality assurance was performed using radiochromic film, with films placed in the high dose regions of each PTV. Normal tissue volumes receiving 12 Gy and 6 Gy (V12 and V6) were computed for each plan. Conformity index (CI) and gamma evaluations (95% of points passing 4%/0.5mm) were computed for each PTV. Results: Delivery times, including beam on and table rotation times, were comparable: 17 – 22 minutes for all deliveries. V12s for DCA plans were (18.5±15.2 cc) vs. VMAT (19.7±14.4 cc). V6s were significantly lower for DCA (69.0±52.0 cc) compared with VMAT (154.0±91.0 cc) (p <<0.05). CIs for VMAT targets were (1.38±0.50) vs. DCA (1.61±0.41). 36 of 37 DCA planned targets passed gamma tests, while 29 of 37 VMAT planned targets passed. Conclusion: Single isocenter DCA plans were easily achieved. The evaluation suggests that DCA may represent a favorable technique compared with VMAT for multiple target SRS by reducing dose to normal tissue and more accurately depicting deliverable dose.« less
  • Previous work demonstrated improved dosimetry of single isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of multiple intracranial targets when they are located ≤ 4 cm from isocenter because of narrower multileaf collimators (MLCs). In follow-up, we sought to determine if decreasing isocenter-target distance (d{sub iso}) by using 2 to 3 isocenters would improve dosimetry for spatially dispersed targets. We also investigated the effect of a maximum dose constraint during VMAT optimization, and the dosimetric effect of the number of VMAT arcs used for a larger number of targets (i.e., 7 to 9). We identified radiosurgery cases that had multiple intracranial targetsmore » with d{sub iso} of at least 1 target > 5 cm. A single isocenter VMAT plan was created using a standardized 4-arc technique with 18 Gy per target. Each case was then replanned (1) using 2 to 3 isocenters, (2) including a maximum dose constraint per target, and in the case of 7 to 9 targets, (3) using 3 to 6 arcs. Dose evaluation included brain V{sub 6} {sub Gy} and V{sub 12} {sub Gy}, and conformity index (CI), gradient index (GI), and heterogeneity index (HI) per target. Two isocenters were sufficient to limit d{sub iso} to ≤ 4 cm and ≤ 5 cm for 11/15 and 13/15 cases, respectively; after replanning with 2 to 3 isocenters, d{sub iso} decreased from 5.8 ± 2.8 cm (2.3 14.9) to 2.5 ± 1.4 cm (0 5.2). All dose statistics improved on average, albeit modestly: V{sub 6} {sub Gy} = 6.9 ± 7.1%, V{sub 12} {sub Gy} = 0.9% ± 4.4%, CI = 2.6% ± 4.6%, GI = 0.9% ± 12.7%, and HI = 2.6% ± 5.2%; however, the number of arcs doubled and monitor units increase by nearly 2-fold. A maximum dose constraint had a negative effect on all dose indices, increasing V{sub 12} {sub Gy} by 9.7 ± 6.9%. For ≥ 7 targets, increasing number of arcs to > 3 improved CI, V{sub 12} {sub Gy}, and V{sub 6} {sub Gy}. A single isocenter is likely sufficient for VMAT radiosurgery of multiple intracranial metastases. Optimal treatment plan quality is achieved when no constraint is placed on the maximum target dose; for cases with many targets at least 4 arcs are needed for optimal plan quality.« less