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Title: Optimization of brain metastases radiotherapy with TomoHDA

Abstract

An upgrade of the helical tomotherapy technology by introducing variable fan-field width (dynamic jaws) reduced the penumbra in superior-inferior direction for the target. Possible implementation of this upgrade even for the cases of the targets with different dose prescriptions is proposed. An example of brain metastasis in proximity to the optical apparatus in need of the whole brain irradiation of 30 Gy and higher dose to the lesion is considered.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22685182
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CT-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY; IMPLEMENTATION; IRRADIATION; JAW; METASTASES; OPTIMIZATION; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Yartsev, Slav, E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca, and Bauman, Glenn. Optimization of brain metastases radiotherapy with TomoHDA. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.11.003.
Yartsev, Slav, E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca, & Bauman, Glenn. Optimization of brain metastases radiotherapy with TomoHDA. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.11.003.
Yartsev, Slav, E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca, and Bauman, Glenn. Sat . "Optimization of brain metastases radiotherapy with TomoHDA". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.11.003.
@article{osti_22685182,
title = {Optimization of brain metastases radiotherapy with TomoHDA},
author = {Yartsev, Slav, E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca and Bauman, Glenn},
abstractNote = {An upgrade of the helical tomotherapy technology by introducing variable fan-field width (dynamic jaws) reduced the penumbra in superior-inferior direction for the target. Possible implementation of this upgrade even for the cases of the targets with different dose prescriptions is proposed. An example of brain metastasis in proximity to the optical apparatus in need of the whole brain irradiation of 30 Gy and higher dose to the lesion is considered.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.11.003},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 1,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To compare the results of whole-brain radiotherapy plus stereotactic radiosurgery (WBRT+SRS) with those of surgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy and a boost to the metastatic site (OP+WBRT+boost) for patients with one or two brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Survival, intracerebral control, and local control of the treated metastases were retrospectively evaluated. To reduce the risk of selection bias, a matched-pair analysis was performed. The outcomes of 47 patients who received WBRT+SRS were compared with those of a second cohort of 47 patients who received OP+WBRT+boost. The two treatment groups were matched for the following potential prognostic factors: WBRT schedule, age,more » gender, performance status, tumor type, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT. Results: The 1-year survival rates were 65% after WBRT+SRS and 63% after OP+WBRT+boost (p = 0.19). The 1-year intracerebral control rates were 70% and 78% (p = 0.39), respectively. The 1-year local control rates were 84% and 83% (p = 0.87), respectively. On multivariate analyses, improved survival was significantly associated with better performance status (p = 0.009), no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.004), recursive partitioning analysis Class 1 (p = 0.004), and interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT (p = 0.001). Intracerebral control was not significantly associated with any of the potential prognostic factors. Improved local control was significantly associated with no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.037). Conclusions: Treatment outcomes were not significantly different after WBRT+SRS compared with OP+WBRT+boost. However, WBRT+SRS is less invasive than OP+WBRT+boost and may be preferable for patients with one or two brain metastases. The results should be confirmed by randomized t0011ria.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence of brain atrophy and dementia after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases not undergoing surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients underwent WBRT to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with or without a 10-Gy boost. Brain magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed before and soon after radiotherapy, every 3 months for 18 months, and every 6 months thereafter. Brain atrophy was evaluated by change in cerebrospinal fluid-cranial ratio (CCR), and the atrophy index was defined as postradiation CCR divided by preradiation CCR. Results: Of 101 patients (medianmore » age, 62 years) entering the study, 92 completed WBRT, and 45, 25, and 10 patients were assessable at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Mean atrophy index was 1.24 {+-} 0.39 (SD) at 6 months and 1.32 {+-} 0.40 at 12 months, and 18% and 28% of the patients had an increase in the atrophy index by 30% or greater, respectively. No apparent decrease in mean MMSE score was observed after WBRT. Individually, MMSE scores decreased by four or more points in 11% at 6 months, 12% at 12 months, and 0% at 18 months. However, about half the decrease in MMSE scores was associated with a decrease in performance status caused by systemic disease progression. Conclusions: Brain atrophy developed in up to 30% of patients, but it was not necessarily accompanied by MMSE score decrease. Dementia after WBRT unaccompanied by tumor recurrence was infrequent.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the prognostic factors for radiographic response and its prognostic value for subsequent survival in patients undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five hundred fifteen eligible patients were randomized in a phase III trial evaluating WBRT and supplemental oxygen with or without efaproxiral, an allosteric modifier of hemoglobin that reduces hemoglobin oxygen-binding affinity and enhances tumor oxygenation, potentially increasing tumor radiosensitivity. Brain images were obtained at baseline and at scheduled follow-up visits after WBRT. Landmark analysis was used to assess the ability of response at selected time points to predict subsequent survival. Logistic regressionmore » was used to assess determinants of response at 3 months. Results: Treatment arm, Karnofsky Performance Status, presence or absence of liver metastases, and primary site were all determinants of response at the 3-month follow-up visit, with patients in the efaproxiral arm experiencing a 67% greater odds of response at this visit (p = 0.02). Response at 3 and 6 months was a significant prognostic factor for longer subsequent survival. Conclusions: The 3-month scan is a valuable prognostic factor for subsequent survival in patients with brain metastases treated with WBRT. Patients in the efaproxiral arm had a higher response rate at 3 and 6 months than those in the control arm.« less
  • Purpose: To assess retrospectively a strategy that uses Gamma-Knife radiosurgery (GKR) in the management of patients with brain metastases (BMs) of malignant melanoma (MM). Methods: GKR without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was performed for patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) of 60 or above who harbored 1 to 4 BMs of 30 mm or less and was repeated as often as needed. Survival was assessed in the whole population, whereas local-control rates were assessed for patients with follow-up longer than 3 months. Results: A total of 221 BMs were treated in 106 patients; 61.3% had a single BM. Median survival frommore » the time of GKR was 5.09 months. Control rate of treated BMs was 83.7%, with 14% of complete response (14 BMs), 42% of partial response (41 BMs), and 43% of stabilization (43 BMs). In multivariate analysis, survival prognosis factors retained were KPS greater than 80, cortical or subcortical location, and Score Index for Radiosurgery (SIR) greater than 6. On the basis of KPS, BM location, and age, a score called MM-GKR, predictive of survival in our population, was defined. Conclusion: Gamma-Knife radiosurgery provides a surgery-like ability to obtain control of a solitary BM and could be consider as an alternative treatment to the combination of GKR+WBRT as a palliative strategy. MM-GKR classification is more adapted to MM patients than are SIR, RPA and Brain Score for Brain Metastasis.« less
  • Purpose: Brain metastases of melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma have traditionally responded poorly to conventional treatments, including surgery and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Several studies have suggested a beneficial effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We evaluated our institutional experience with systematic SRS in patients harboring these 'radioresistant' metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with brain metastases from melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma underwent SRS with or without WBRT or surgical resection. All patients had Karnofsky performance scores >70, and SRS was performed before the initiation of systemic therapy. The survival time was calculated from the diagnosis of brainmore » metastases using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Statistical significance was calculated using the log-rank test. Factors influencing survival, including surgical resection, WBRT, gender, number of SRS sessions, and histologic type, were evaluated retrospectively using Cox univariate models. Results: The overall median survival was 427 days (14.2 months), which appears superior to the results obtained with conventional WBRT. The addition of neither surgery nor WBRT to SRS provided a statistically significant increase in survival. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients undergoing SRS for up to five cerebral metastases from 'radioresistant' tumors (melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma) have survival rates comparable to those in other series of more selected patients. The addition of surgical resection or WBRT did not result in improved survival in our series.« less