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Title: The dilemma of parotid gland and pharyngeal constrictor muscles preservation—Is daily online image guidance required? A dosimetric analysis

Abstract

With margin reduction common in head and neck radiotherapy, it is critical that the dosimetric effects of setup deviations are quantified. With past studies focusing on the quantification of positional and volumetric changes of organs at risk (OARs), this study aimed to measure the dose delivered to these the parotid gland (PG) and pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCMs) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Furthermore, this investigation sought to establish a potential time trend of change in dose delivered to target volumes secondary to ascertaining the need for daily image guidance (IG) to reduce the dose burden to these important OARs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 5 locally advanced head and neck patients' plans were created and mapped to weekly CBCTs. Each plan was recalculated without heterogeneity correction allowing for dosimetric comparison. Dosimetric endpoints recorded to assess the effect of positional variation were as per ICRU 83 and included D{sub 95} and D{sub 98} for the target volumes, mean dose (MD) and V{sub 30} {sub Gy} for the PGs, and V{sub 50} {sub Gy} and MD for the PCMs. Results were deemed statistically significant if p < 0.05. No significant time trends were established for these OARs. A significant decreasemore » in V{sub 50} {sub Gy} was observed for all PCMs (p < 0.001) on all CBCTs relative to the original plan. Regarding target volumes, a highly significant decrease in MD (MD = 20 Gy, CI: −20.310 to −19.820) in D{sub 98} of the high-dose planning target volume (PTV [70 Gy]; PTVD{sub 98%} = 70 Gy) for case 3 was found (p ≤ 0.001). A nonpredictable, yet significant dosimetric effect was found. A clinically acceptable balance must be achieved between OAR dosimetry and target coverage as can be achieved by frequent IG.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22685177
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; DOSIMETRY; GLANDS; HAZARDS; HEAD; ICRU; IMAGES; MUSCLES; NECK; NEOPLASMS; PLANNING; PRESERVATION; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Duffy, Olivia, Forde, Elizabeth, and Leech, Michelle, E-mail: leechm@tcd.ie. The dilemma of parotid gland and pharyngeal constrictor muscles preservation—Is daily online image guidance required? A dosimetric analysis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.10.003.
Duffy, Olivia, Forde, Elizabeth, & Leech, Michelle, E-mail: leechm@tcd.ie. The dilemma of parotid gland and pharyngeal constrictor muscles preservation—Is daily online image guidance required? A dosimetric analysis. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.10.003.
Duffy, Olivia, Forde, Elizabeth, and Leech, Michelle, E-mail: leechm@tcd.ie. Sat . "The dilemma of parotid gland and pharyngeal constrictor muscles preservation—Is daily online image guidance required? A dosimetric analysis". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.10.003.
@article{osti_22685177,
title = {The dilemma of parotid gland and pharyngeal constrictor muscles preservation—Is daily online image guidance required? A dosimetric analysis},
author = {Duffy, Olivia and Forde, Elizabeth and Leech, Michelle, E-mail: leechm@tcd.ie},
abstractNote = {With margin reduction common in head and neck radiotherapy, it is critical that the dosimetric effects of setup deviations are quantified. With past studies focusing on the quantification of positional and volumetric changes of organs at risk (OARs), this study aimed to measure the dose delivered to these the parotid gland (PG) and pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCMs) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Furthermore, this investigation sought to establish a potential time trend of change in dose delivered to target volumes secondary to ascertaining the need for daily image guidance (IG) to reduce the dose burden to these important OARs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 5 locally advanced head and neck patients' plans were created and mapped to weekly CBCTs. Each plan was recalculated without heterogeneity correction allowing for dosimetric comparison. Dosimetric endpoints recorded to assess the effect of positional variation were as per ICRU 83 and included D{sub 95} and D{sub 98} for the target volumes, mean dose (MD) and V{sub 30} {sub Gy} for the PGs, and V{sub 50} {sub Gy} and MD for the PCMs. Results were deemed statistically significant if p < 0.05. No significant time trends were established for these OARs. A significant decrease in V{sub 50} {sub Gy} was observed for all PCMs (p < 0.001) on all CBCTs relative to the original plan. Regarding target volumes, a highly significant decrease in MD (MD = 20 Gy, CI: −20.310 to −19.820) in D{sub 98} of the high-dose planning target volume (PTV [70 Gy]; PTVD{sub 98%} = 70 Gy) for case 3 was found (p ≤ 0.001). A nonpredictable, yet significant dosimetric effect was found. A clinically acceptable balance must be achieved between OAR dosimetry and target coverage as can be achieved by frequent IG.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2016.10.003},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 1,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the anatomical changes and associated dosimetric consequences to the pharyngeal constrictor (PC) that occurs during head and neck radiotherapy (H&N RT). Methods: A cohort of 13 oro-pharyngeal cancer patients, who had daily CBCT’s for localization, was retrospectively studied. On every 5th CBCT, PC was manually delineated by a radiation oncologist. The anterior-posterior PC thickness was measured at the C3 level. Delivered dose to PC was estimated by calculating daily doses on CBCT’s, and accumulating to corresponding planning CT images. For accumulation, a parameter-optimized B- spline-based deformable image registration algorithm (Elastix) was used, in conjunction with an energy-massmore » mapping dose transfer algorithm. Mean and maximum dose (Dmean, Dmax) to PC was determined and compared with corresponding planned quantities. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) volume increase (ΔV) and thickness increase (Δt) over the course of 35 total fractions were 54±33% (11.9±7.6 cc), and 63±39% (2.9±1.9 mm), respectively. The resultant cumulative mean dose increase from planned dose to PC (ΔDmean) was 1.4±1.3% (0.9±0.8 Gy), while the maximum dose increase (ΔDmax) was 0.0±1.6% (0.0±1.1 Gy). Patients with adaptive replanning (n=6) showed a smaller mean dose increase than those without (n=7); 0.5±0.2% (0.3±0.1 Gy) vs. 2.2±1.4% (1.4±0.9 Gy). There was a statistically significant (p<0.0001) strong correlation between ΔDmean and Δt (Pearson coefficient r=0.78), and a moderate-to-strong correlation (r=0.52) between ΔDmean and ΔV. Correlation between ΔDmean and weight loss ΔW (r=0.1), as well as ΔV and ΔW (r=0.2) were negligible. Conclusion: Patients were found to undergo considerable anatomical changes to pharyngeal constrictor during H&N RT, resulting in non-negligible dose deviations from intended dose. Results are indicative that pharyngeal constrictor thickness, measured at C3 level, is a good predictor for the dose change to the organ. Daily deformable registration and dose accumulation provide a reliable means to assess important anatomical and dosimetric changes to pharyngeal constrictor occurring during treatment. This work was supported in part by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.« less
  • Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria formore » Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze changes in parotid gland dose resulting from anatomic changes throughout a course of radiotherapy in a cohort of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 10 head-and-neck cancer patients treated definitively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy on a helical tomotherapy unit. A total of 330 daily megavoltage computed tomography images were retrospectively processed through a deformable image registration algorithm to be registered to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography images. The process resulted in deformed parotid contours and voxel mappings for both daily and accumulated dose-volume histogram calculations. The daily and cumulative dose deviations from themore » original treatment plan were analyzed. Correlations between dosimetric variations and anatomic changes were investigated. Results: The daily parotid mean dose of the 10 patients differed from the plan dose by an average of 15%. At the end of the treatment, 3 of the 10 patients were estimated to have received a greater than 10% higher mean parotid dose than in the original plan (range, 13-42%), whereas the remaining 7 patients received doses that differed by less than 10% (range, -6-8%). The dose difference was correlated with a migration of the parotids toward the high-dose region. Conclusions: The use of deformable image registration techniques and daily megavoltage computed tomography imaging makes it possible to calculate daily and accumulated dose-volume histograms. Significant dose variations were observed as result of interfractional anatomic changes. These techniques enable the implementation of dose-adaptive radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy can improve protection of organs at risk when large abdominal target volumes are irradiated. We estimated the daily positioning accuracy of ultrasound-based image guidance for abdominal target volumes by a direct comparison of daily imaging obtained with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Daily positioning (n = 83 positionings) of 15 patients was completed by using ultrasound guidance after an initial CBCT was obtained. Residual error after ultrasound was estimated by comparison with a second CBCT. Ultrasound image quality was visually rated using a scale of 1 to 4. Results: Of 15 patients, 7more » patients had good sonographic imaging quality, 5 patients had satisfactory sonographic quality, and 3 patients were excluded because of unsatisfactory sonographic quality. When image quality was good, residual errors after ultrasound were -0.1 {+-} 3.11 mm in the x direction (left-right; group systematic error M = -0.09 mm; standard deviation [SD] of systematic error, {sigma} = 1.37 mm; SD of the random error, {sigma} = 2.99 mm), 0.93 {+-} 4.31 mm in the y direction (superior-inferior, M = 1.12 mm; {sigma} = 2.96 mm; {sigma} = 3.39 mm), and 0.71 {+-} 3.15 mm in the z direction (anteroposterior; M = 1.01 mm; {sigma} = 2.46 mm; {sigma} = 2.24 mm). For patients with satisfactory image quality, residual error after ultrasound was -0.6 {+-} 5.26 mm in the x (M = 0.07 mm; {sigma} = 5.67 mm; {sigma} = 4.86 mm), 1.76 {+-} 4.92 mm in the y (M = 3.54 mm; {sigma} = 4.1 mm; {sigma} = 5.29 mm), and 1.19 {+-} 4.75 mm in the z (M = 0.82 mm; {sigma} = 2.86 mm; {sigma} = 3.05 mm) directions. Conclusions: In patients from whom good sonographic image quality could be obtained, ultrasound improved daily positioning accuracy. In the case of satisfactory image quality, ultrasound guidance improved accuracy compared to that of skin marks only minimally. If sonographic image quality was unsatisfactory, daily CBCT scanning improved treatment accuracy distinctly over that of ultrasound. Use of daily ultrasound or CBCT imaging can help to reduce PTV margins and protect organs at risk compared to the use of skin mark-based positioning.« less
  • The authors compared two digital-image feature-extraction methods for the analysis of microsialograms of the mouse parotid gland following either overfilling, experimentally induced acute sialoadenitis or irradiation. Microsialograms were digitized using a drum-scanning microdensitometer. The grey levels were then partitioned into four bands representing soft tissue, peripheral minor, middle-sized and major ducts, and run-length and histogram analysis of the digital images performed. Serial analysis of microsialograms during progressive filling showed that both methods depicted the structural characteristics of the ducts at each grey level. However, in the experimental groups, run-length analysis showed slight changes in the peripheral duct system more clearly.more » This method was therefore considered more effective than histogram analysis.« less