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Title: Asymmetric dark matter models in SO(10)

Abstract

We systematically study the possibilities for asymmetric dark matter in the context of non-supersymmetric SO(10) models of grand unification. Dark matter stability in SO(10) is guaranteed by a remnant Z{sub 2} symmetry which is preserved when the intermediate scale gauge subgroup of SO(10) is broken by a (\bf 126) dimensional representation. The asymmetry in the dark matter states is directly generated through the out-of-equilibrium decay of particles around the intermediate scale, or transferred from the baryon/lepton asymmetry generated in the Standard Model sector by leptogenesis. We systematically classify possible asymmetric dark matter candidates in terms of their quantum numbers, and derive the conditions for each case that the observed dark matter density is (mostly) explained by the asymmetry of dark matter particles.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–0033 (Japan)
  2. School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22680038
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: 02; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ASYMMETRY; BARYONS; DENSITY; EQUILIBRIUM; LEPTONS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PARTICLE DECAY; PARTICLE PRODUCTION; QUANTUM NUMBERS; SO-10 GROUPS; STANDARD MODEL; SUPERSYMMETRY; SYMMETRY BREAKING

Citation Formats

Nagata, Natsumi, Olive, Keith A., and Zheng, Jiaming, E-mail: natsumi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: zheng@physics.umn.edu. Asymmetric dark matter models in SO(10). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/016.
Nagata, Natsumi, Olive, Keith A., & Zheng, Jiaming, E-mail: natsumi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: zheng@physics.umn.edu. Asymmetric dark matter models in SO(10). United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/016.
Nagata, Natsumi, Olive, Keith A., and Zheng, Jiaming, E-mail: natsumi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: zheng@physics.umn.edu. Wed . "Asymmetric dark matter models in SO(10)". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/016.
@article{osti_22680038,
title = {Asymmetric dark matter models in SO(10)},
author = {Nagata, Natsumi and Olive, Keith A. and Zheng, Jiaming, E-mail: natsumi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: zheng@physics.umn.edu},
abstractNote = {We systematically study the possibilities for asymmetric dark matter in the context of non-supersymmetric SO(10) models of grand unification. Dark matter stability in SO(10) is guaranteed by a remnant Z{sub 2} symmetry which is preserved when the intermediate scale gauge subgroup of SO(10) is broken by a (\bf 126) dimensional representation. The asymmetry in the dark matter states is directly generated through the out-of-equilibrium decay of particles around the intermediate scale, or transferred from the baryon/lepton asymmetry generated in the Standard Model sector by leptogenesis. We systematically classify possible asymmetric dark matter candidates in terms of their quantum numbers, and derive the conditions for each case that the observed dark matter density is (mostly) explained by the asymmetry of dark matter particles.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/016},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 02,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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