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Title: Quark nugget dark matter: no contradiction with 511 keV line emission from dwarf galaxies

Abstract

The observed galactic 511 keV line has been interpreted in a number of papers as a possible signal of dark matter annihilation within the galactic bulge. If this is the case then it is possible that a similar spectral feature may be observed in association with nearby dwarf galaxies. These objects are believed to be strongly dark matter dominated and present a relatively clean observational target. Recently INTEGRAL observations have provided new constraints on the 511 keV flux from nearby dwarf galaxies [1] motivating further investigation into the mechanism by which this radiation may arise. In the model presented here dark matter in the form of heavy quark nuggets produces the galactic 511 keV emission line through interactions with the visible matter. It is argued that this type of interaction is not strongly constrained by the flux limits reported in [2].

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22680004
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: 02; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANNIHILATION; B QUARKS; C QUARKS; EMISSION SPECTRA; GALAXIES; KEV RANGE; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; T QUARKS

Citation Formats

Lawson, Kyle, and Zhitnitsky, Ariel, E-mail: klawson@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: arz@phas.ubc.ca. Quark nugget dark matter: no contradiction with 511 keV line emission from dwarf galaxies. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/049.
Lawson, Kyle, & Zhitnitsky, Ariel, E-mail: klawson@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: arz@phas.ubc.ca. Quark nugget dark matter: no contradiction with 511 keV line emission from dwarf galaxies. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/049.
Lawson, Kyle, and Zhitnitsky, Ariel, E-mail: klawson@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: arz@phas.ubc.ca. Wed . "Quark nugget dark matter: no contradiction with 511 keV line emission from dwarf galaxies". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/049.
@article{osti_22680004,
title = {Quark nugget dark matter: no contradiction with 511 keV line emission from dwarf galaxies},
author = {Lawson, Kyle and Zhitnitsky, Ariel, E-mail: klawson@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: arz@phas.ubc.ca},
abstractNote = {The observed galactic 511 keV line has been interpreted in a number of papers as a possible signal of dark matter annihilation within the galactic bulge. If this is the case then it is possible that a similar spectral feature may be observed in association with nearby dwarf galaxies. These objects are believed to be strongly dark matter dominated and present a relatively clean observational target. Recently INTEGRAL observations have provided new constraints on the 511 keV flux from nearby dwarf galaxies [1] motivating further investigation into the mechanism by which this radiation may arise. In the model presented here dark matter in the form of heavy quark nuggets produces the galactic 511 keV emission line through interactions with the visible matter. It is argued that this type of interaction is not strongly constrained by the flux limits reported in [2].},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2017/02/049},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 02,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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