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Title: Detection prospects for high energy neutrino sources from the anisotropic matter distribution in the local Universe

Abstract

Constraints on the number and luminosity of the sources of the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube have been set by targeted searches for point sources. We set complementary constraints by using the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) catalogue, which maps the matter distribution of the local Universe. Assuming that the distribution of the neutrino sources follows that of matter, we look for correlations between ''warm'' spots on the IceCube skymap and the 2MRS matter distribution. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the expected number of neutrino multiplets and careful modelling of the detector performance (including that of IceCube-Gen2), we demonstrate that sources with local density exceeding 10{sup −6} Mpc{sup −3} and neutrino luminosity L {sub ν} ∼< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1} (10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1}) will be efficiently revealed by our method using IceCube (IceCube-Gen2). At low luminosities such as will be probed by IceCube-Gen2, the sensitivity of this analysis is superior to requiring statistically significant direct observation of a point source.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22679993
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: 03; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANISOTROPY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CORRELATIONS; COSMIC NEUTRINOS; DENSITY; DETECTION; DISTRIBUTION; ICECUBE NEUTRINO DETECTOR; LUMINOSITY; MONTE CARLO METHOD; MULTIPLETS; PERFORMANCE; POINT SOURCES; RED SHIFT; SENSITIVITY; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Mertsch, Philipp, Rameez, Mohamed, and Tamborra, Irene, E-mail: mertsch@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: mohamed.rameez@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: tamborra@nbi.ku.dk. Detection prospects for high energy neutrino sources from the anisotropic matter distribution in the local Universe. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/03/011.
Mertsch, Philipp, Rameez, Mohamed, & Tamborra, Irene, E-mail: mertsch@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: mohamed.rameez@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: tamborra@nbi.ku.dk. Detection prospects for high energy neutrino sources from the anisotropic matter distribution in the local Universe. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/03/011.
Mertsch, Philipp, Rameez, Mohamed, and Tamborra, Irene, E-mail: mertsch@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: mohamed.rameez@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: tamborra@nbi.ku.dk. Wed . "Detection prospects for high energy neutrino sources from the anisotropic matter distribution in the local Universe". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/03/011.
@article{osti_22679993,
title = {Detection prospects for high energy neutrino sources from the anisotropic matter distribution in the local Universe},
author = {Mertsch, Philipp and Rameez, Mohamed and Tamborra, Irene, E-mail: mertsch@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: mohamed.rameez@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: tamborra@nbi.ku.dk},
abstractNote = {Constraints on the number and luminosity of the sources of the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube have been set by targeted searches for point sources. We set complementary constraints by using the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) catalogue, which maps the matter distribution of the local Universe. Assuming that the distribution of the neutrino sources follows that of matter, we look for correlations between ''warm'' spots on the IceCube skymap and the 2MRS matter distribution. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the expected number of neutrino multiplets and careful modelling of the detector performance (including that of IceCube-Gen2), we demonstrate that sources with local density exceeding 10{sup −6} Mpc{sup −3} and neutrino luminosity L {sub ν} ∼< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1} (10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1}) will be efficiently revealed by our method using IceCube (IceCube-Gen2). At low luminosities such as will be probed by IceCube-Gen2, the sensitivity of this analysis is superior to requiring statistically significant direct observation of a point source.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2017/03/011},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 03,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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