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Title: An XMM-Newton Study of the Mixed-morphology Supernova Remnant G346.6-0.2

Abstract

We present an X-ray imaging and spectroscopic study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology supernova remnant G346.6–0.2 using XMM-Newton . The X-ray spectrum of the remnant is well described by a recombining plasma that most likely arises from adiabatic cooling and has subsolar abundances of Mg, Si, and S. Our fits also suggest the presence of either an additional power-law component with a photon index of ∼2 or an additional thermal component with a temperature of ∼2.0 keV. We investigate the possible origin of this component and suggest that it could arise from either the Galactic ridge X-ray emission, an unidentified pulsar wind nebula, or X-ray synchrotron emission from high-energy particles accelerated at the shock. However, deeper, high-resolution observations of this object are needed to shed light on the presence and origin of this feature. Based on its morphology, its Galactic latitude, the density of the surrounding environment, and its association with a dense molecular cloud, G346.6–0.2 most likely arises from a massive progenitor that underwent core collapse.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China)
  3. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22679797
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 847; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CLOUDS; COOLING; DENSITY; ELEMENT ABUNDANCE; EMISSION; KEV RANGE; NEBULAE; PHOTONS; PLASMA; PULSARS; RESOLUTION; STELLAR WINDS; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION; X RADIATION; X-RAY SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Auchettl, Katie, Lopez, Laura, Ng, C-Y., Wong, B. T. T., and Slane, Patrick, E-mail: auchettl.1@osu.edu, E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk. An XMM-Newton Study of the Mixed-morphology Supernova Remnant G346.6-0.2. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA830E.
Auchettl, Katie, Lopez, Laura, Ng, C-Y., Wong, B. T. T., & Slane, Patrick, E-mail: auchettl.1@osu.edu, E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk. An XMM-Newton Study of the Mixed-morphology Supernova Remnant G346.6-0.2. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA830E.
Auchettl, Katie, Lopez, Laura, Ng, C-Y., Wong, B. T. T., and Slane, Patrick, E-mail: auchettl.1@osu.edu, E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk. Sun . "An XMM-Newton Study of the Mixed-morphology Supernova Remnant G346.6-0.2". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA830E.
@article{osti_22679797,
title = {An XMM-Newton Study of the Mixed-morphology Supernova Remnant G346.6-0.2},
author = {Auchettl, Katie and Lopez, Laura and Ng, C-Y. and Wong, B. T. T. and Slane, Patrick, E-mail: auchettl.1@osu.edu, E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk},
abstractNote = {We present an X-ray imaging and spectroscopic study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology supernova remnant G346.6–0.2 using XMM-Newton . The X-ray spectrum of the remnant is well described by a recombining plasma that most likely arises from adiabatic cooling and has subsolar abundances of Mg, Si, and S. Our fits also suggest the presence of either an additional power-law component with a photon index of ∼2 or an additional thermal component with a temperature of ∼2.0 keV. We investigate the possible origin of this component and suggest that it could arise from either the Galactic ridge X-ray emission, an unidentified pulsar wind nebula, or X-ray synchrotron emission from high-energy particles accelerated at the shock. However, deeper, high-resolution observations of this object are needed to shed light on the presence and origin of this feature. Based on its morphology, its Galactic latitude, the density of the surrounding environment, and its association with a dense molecular cloud, G346.6–0.2 most likely arises from a massive progenitor that underwent core collapse.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA830E},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 847,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}