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Title: Searching for Strange Quark Matter Objects in Exoplanets

Abstract

The true ground state of hadronic matter may be strange quark matter (SQM). Consequently, observed pulsars may actually be strange quark stars, but not neutron stars. However, proving or disproving the SQM hypothesis still remains a difficult problem to solve due to the similarity between the macroscopical characteristics of strange quark stars and neutron stars. Here, we propose a hopeful method to probe the existence of SQM. In the framework of the SQM hypothesis, strange quark dwarfs and even strange quark planets can also stably exist. Noting that SQM planets will not be tidally disrupted even when they get very close to their host stars due to their extreme compactness, we argue that we could identify SQM planets by searching for very close-in planets among extrasolar planetary systems. Especially, we should keep our eyes on possible pulsar planets with orbital radius less than ∼5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm and period less than ∼6100 s. A thorough search in the currently detected ∼2950 exoplanets around normal main-sequence stars has failed to identify any stable close-in objects that meet the SQM criteria, i.e., lying in the tidal disruption region for normal matter planets. However, the pulsar planet PSR J1719-1438B, with an orbitalmore » radius of ∼6 × 10{sup 10} cm and orbital period of 7837 s, is, encouragingly, found to be a good candidate.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Astronomy, School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22679743
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 848; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COMPACTS; GROUND STATES; HYPOTHESIS; INTERACTIONS; MAIN SEQUENCE STARS; NEUTRON STARS; NEUTRONS; PLANETS; PULSARS; QUARK MATTER; S QUARKS

Citation Formats

Huang, Y. F., and Yu, Y. B., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn. Searching for Strange Quark Matter Objects in Exoplanets. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA8B63.
Huang, Y. F., & Yu, Y. B., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn. Searching for Strange Quark Matter Objects in Exoplanets. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA8B63.
Huang, Y. F., and Yu, Y. B., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn. Fri . "Searching for Strange Quark Matter Objects in Exoplanets". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA8B63.
@article{osti_22679743,
title = {Searching for Strange Quark Matter Objects in Exoplanets},
author = {Huang, Y. F. and Yu, Y. B., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {The true ground state of hadronic matter may be strange quark matter (SQM). Consequently, observed pulsars may actually be strange quark stars, but not neutron stars. However, proving or disproving the SQM hypothesis still remains a difficult problem to solve due to the similarity between the macroscopical characteristics of strange quark stars and neutron stars. Here, we propose a hopeful method to probe the existence of SQM. In the framework of the SQM hypothesis, strange quark dwarfs and even strange quark planets can also stably exist. Noting that SQM planets will not be tidally disrupted even when they get very close to their host stars due to their extreme compactness, we argue that we could identify SQM planets by searching for very close-in planets among extrasolar planetary systems. Especially, we should keep our eyes on possible pulsar planets with orbital radius less than ∼5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm and period less than ∼6100 s. A thorough search in the currently detected ∼2950 exoplanets around normal main-sequence stars has failed to identify any stable close-in objects that meet the SQM criteria, i.e., lying in the tidal disruption region for normal matter planets. However, the pulsar planet PSR J1719-1438B, with an orbital radius of ∼6 × 10{sup 10} cm and orbital period of 7837 s, is, encouragingly, found to be a good candidate.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA8B63},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 848,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Oct 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Oct 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}