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Title: A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate-mass compact halo objects

Abstract

The failure to find evidence for elementary particles that could serve as the constituents of dark matter brings to mind suggestions that dark matter might consist of massive compact objects (MACHOs). In particular, it has recently been argued that MACHOs with masses > 15 M {sub ⊙} may have been prolifically produced at the onset of the big bang. Although a variety of astrophysical signatures for primordial MACHOs with masses in this range have been discussed in the literature, we favor a strategy that uses the potential for magnification of stars outside our galaxy due to gravitational microlensing of these stars by MACHOs in the halo of our galaxy. We point out that the effect of the motion of the Earth on the shape of the micro-lensing brightening curves provides a promising approach to testing over the course of next several years the hypothesis that dark matter consists of massive compact objects.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22679395
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2016; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 1475-7516
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ASTROPHYSICS; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; GALAXIES; HYPOTHESIS; LENSES; MASS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; STARS

Citation Formats

Chapline, George F., and Frampton, Paul H., E-mail: george.chapline@gmail.com, E-mail: paul.h.frampton@gmail.com. A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate-mass compact halo objects. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/042.
Chapline, George F., & Frampton, Paul H., E-mail: george.chapline@gmail.com, E-mail: paul.h.frampton@gmail.com. A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate-mass compact halo objects. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/042.
Chapline, George F., and Frampton, Paul H., E-mail: george.chapline@gmail.com, E-mail: paul.h.frampton@gmail.com. Tue . "A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate-mass compact halo objects". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/042.
@article{osti_22679395,
title = {A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate-mass compact halo objects},
author = {Chapline, George F. and Frampton, Paul H., E-mail: george.chapline@gmail.com, E-mail: paul.h.frampton@gmail.com},
abstractNote = {The failure to find evidence for elementary particles that could serve as the constituents of dark matter brings to mind suggestions that dark matter might consist of massive compact objects (MACHOs). In particular, it has recently been argued that MACHOs with masses > 15 M {sub ⊙} may have been prolifically produced at the onset of the big bang. Although a variety of astrophysical signatures for primordial MACHOs with masses in this range have been discussed in the literature, we favor a strategy that uses the potential for magnification of stars outside our galaxy due to gravitational microlensing of these stars by MACHOs in the halo of our galaxy. We point out that the effect of the motion of the Earth on the shape of the micro-lensing brightening curves provides a promising approach to testing over the course of next several years the hypothesis that dark matter consists of massive compact objects.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/042},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
issn = {1475-7516},
number = 11,
volume = 2016,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {11}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

Remarks on dark matter constituents with many solar masses
journal, September 2018


Tests of gravity theories with Galactic Center observations
journal, October 2019