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Title: Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

Abstract

In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can 'run away,' that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ∼ 10{sup 14}. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ∼ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)
  2. Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22676215
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: 05; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COUPLING; EMISSION; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PLASMA; RELATIVISTIC RANGE; SPEED LIMIT; STANDARD MODEL; TRANSITION RADIATION; VELOCITY; VISIBLE RADIATION; WEINBERG-SALAM GAUGE MODEL

Citation Formats

Bödeker, Dietrich, and Moore, Guy D., E-mail: bodeker@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: guymoore@ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/05/025.
Bödeker, Dietrich, & Moore, Guy D., E-mail: bodeker@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: guymoore@ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/05/025.
Bödeker, Dietrich, and Moore, Guy D., E-mail: bodeker@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: guymoore@ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de. Mon . "Electroweak bubble wall speed limit". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2017/05/025.
@article{osti_22676215,
title = {Electroweak bubble wall speed limit},
author = {Bödeker, Dietrich and Moore, Guy D., E-mail: bodeker@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: guymoore@ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de},
abstractNote = {In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can 'run away,' that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ∼ 10{sup 14}. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ∼ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2017/05/025},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 05,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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