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Title: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RADIO-LOUD AND RADIO-QUIET γ -RAY PULSARS AS REVEALED BY FERMI

Abstract

By comparing the properties of non-recycled radio-loud γ -ray pulsars and radio-quiet γ -ray pulsars, we have searched for the differences between these two populations. We found that the γ -ray spectral curvature of radio-quiet pulsars can be larger than that of radio-loud pulsars. Based on the full sample of non-recycled γ -ray pulsars, their distributions of the magnetic field strength at the light cylinder are also found to be different. We note that this might result from an observational bias. By reexamining the previously reported difference of γ -ray-to-X-ray flux ratios, we found that the significance can be hampered by their statistical uncertainties. In the context of the outer gap model, we discuss the expected properties of these two populations and compare with the possible differences that are identified in our analysis.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Institute of Particle physics and Astronomy, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)
  3. Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663980
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 834; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COSMIC GAMMA SOURCES; COSMIC RADIO SOURCES; DISTRIBUTION; GAMMA RADIATION; MAGNETIC FIELDS; PULSARS; STARS; VISIBLE RADIATION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Hui, C. Y., Lee, Jongsu, Takata, J., Ng, C. W., and Cheng, K. S., E-mail: cyhui@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: takata@hust.edu.cn. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RADIO-LOUD AND RADIO-QUIET γ -RAY PULSARS AS REVEALED BY FERMI. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/120.
Hui, C. Y., Lee, Jongsu, Takata, J., Ng, C. W., & Cheng, K. S., E-mail: cyhui@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: takata@hust.edu.cn. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RADIO-LOUD AND RADIO-QUIET γ -RAY PULSARS AS REVEALED BY FERMI. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/120.
Hui, C. Y., Lee, Jongsu, Takata, J., Ng, C. W., and Cheng, K. S., E-mail: cyhui@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: takata@hust.edu.cn. Tue . "DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RADIO-LOUD AND RADIO-QUIET γ -RAY PULSARS AS REVEALED BY FERMI". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/120.
@article{osti_22663980,
title = {DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RADIO-LOUD AND RADIO-QUIET γ -RAY PULSARS AS REVEALED BY FERMI},
author = {Hui, C. Y. and Lee, Jongsu and Takata, J. and Ng, C. W. and Cheng, K. S., E-mail: cyhui@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: takata@hust.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {By comparing the properties of non-recycled radio-loud γ -ray pulsars and radio-quiet γ -ray pulsars, we have searched for the differences between these two populations. We found that the γ -ray spectral curvature of radio-quiet pulsars can be larger than that of radio-loud pulsars. Based on the full sample of non-recycled γ -ray pulsars, their distributions of the magnetic field strength at the light cylinder are also found to be different. We note that this might result from an observational bias. By reexamining the previously reported difference of γ -ray-to-X-ray flux ratios, we found that the significance can be hampered by their statistical uncertainties. In the context of the outer gap model, we discuss the expected properties of these two populations and compare with the possible differences that are identified in our analysis.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/120},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 834,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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