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Title: SPECTRAL-TIMING ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER kHz QPO IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY AQUILA X-1

Abstract

Spectral-timing products of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, including energy- and frequency-dependent lags, have been analyzed previously in 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, and 4U 1728-34. Here, we study the spectral-timing properties of the lower kHz QPO of the neutron star LMXB Aquila X-1 for the first time. We compute broadband energy lags as well as energy-dependent lags and the covariance spectrum using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer . We find characteristics similar to those of previously studied systems, including soft lags of ∼30 μ s between the 3.0–8.0 keV and 8.0–20.0 keV energy bands at the average QPO frequency. We also find lags that show a nearly monotonic trend with energy, with the highest-energy photons arriving first. The covariance spectrum of the lower kHz QPO is well fit by a thermal Comptonization model, though we find a seed photon temperature higher than that of the mean spectrum, which was also seen in Peille et al. and indicates the possibility of a composite boundary layer emitting region. Lastly, we see in one set of observations an Fe K component in the covariance spectrum at 2.4- σ confidence, which may raise questions about themore » role of reverberation in the production of lags.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock St, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663968
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 834; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCRETION DISKS; BINARY STARS; BOUNDARY LAYERS; ENERGY DEPENDENCE; FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE; KEV RANGE; KHZ RANGE; MASS; NEUTRON STARS; OSCILLATIONS; PERIODICITY; PHOTON TEMPERATURE; PHOTONS; SPECTRA; TIMING PROPERTIES; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Troyer, Jon S., and Cackett, Edward M., E-mail: jon.troyer@wayne.edu. SPECTRAL-TIMING ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER kHz QPO IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY AQUILA X-1. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/131.
Troyer, Jon S., & Cackett, Edward M., E-mail: jon.troyer@wayne.edu. SPECTRAL-TIMING ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER kHz QPO IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY AQUILA X-1. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/131.
Troyer, Jon S., and Cackett, Edward M., E-mail: jon.troyer@wayne.edu. Tue . "SPECTRAL-TIMING ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER kHz QPO IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY AQUILA X-1". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/131.
@article{osti_22663968,
title = {SPECTRAL-TIMING ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER kHz QPO IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY AQUILA X-1},
author = {Troyer, Jon S. and Cackett, Edward M., E-mail: jon.troyer@wayne.edu},
abstractNote = {Spectral-timing products of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, including energy- and frequency-dependent lags, have been analyzed previously in 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, and 4U 1728-34. Here, we study the spectral-timing properties of the lower kHz QPO of the neutron star LMXB Aquila X-1 for the first time. We compute broadband energy lags as well as energy-dependent lags and the covariance spectrum using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer . We find characteristics similar to those of previously studied systems, including soft lags of ∼30 μ s between the 3.0–8.0 keV and 8.0–20.0 keV energy bands at the average QPO frequency. We also find lags that show a nearly monotonic trend with energy, with the highest-energy photons arriving first. The covariance spectrum of the lower kHz QPO is well fit by a thermal Comptonization model, though we find a seed photon temperature higher than that of the mean spectrum, which was also seen in Peille et al. and indicates the possibility of a composite boundary layer emitting region. Lastly, we see in one set of observations an Fe K component in the covariance spectrum at 2.4- σ confidence, which may raise questions about the role of reverberation in the production of lags.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/834/2/131},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 834,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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