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Title: Application of the Nonballistic Model to the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1752-223 and the Quasar NRAO 150

Abstract

Optical and radio observations of the black hole candidate XTE J1752-223 have exhibited a slightly curved motion of the jet components, which is associated with its radio light curve. In addition, observations of the quasar NRAO 150 have revealed a core–jet structure wobbling with a high angular speed. In this paper, the phenomena displayed in these two different sources are interpreted as the precession of a bent jet. In such a scenario, hot spots reproduced at different separations from the core precess on the same precession cone, in which different components correspond to different propagation times to the observer. By fitting the kinematics of the components of XTE J1752-223 and its light curve with a curved pattern of precession period 314 days, we find that the propagation time can make an earlier event appear later, and the jet axis can oscillate during its precession. Simulating the quasar NRAO 150 with the same scenario reveals that the knots at larger separation from the core precess at a slower speed than those closer in. A possible mechanism relating to the cooling time of a component is proposed. These three new results are of importance in understanding the physics underlying the curved jetmore » as well as the activity of the central engine of different black hole systems.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663940
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; COOLING TIME; COSMIC RADIO SOURCES; GALAXIES; HOT SPOTS; PRECESSION; QUASARS; VELOCITY; VISIBLE RADIATION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Zheng, T. Y., and Gong, B. P., E-mail: bpgong@mail.hust.edu.cn. Application of the Nonballistic Model to the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1752-223 and the Quasar NRAO 150. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/149.
Zheng, T. Y., & Gong, B. P., E-mail: bpgong@mail.hust.edu.cn. Application of the Nonballistic Model to the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1752-223 and the Quasar NRAO 150. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/149.
Zheng, T. Y., and Gong, B. P., E-mail: bpgong@mail.hust.edu.cn. Wed . "Application of the Nonballistic Model to the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1752-223 and the Quasar NRAO 150". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/149.
@article{osti_22663940,
title = {Application of the Nonballistic Model to the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1752-223 and the Quasar NRAO 150},
author = {Zheng, T. Y. and Gong, B. P., E-mail: bpgong@mail.hust.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {Optical and radio observations of the black hole candidate XTE J1752-223 have exhibited a slightly curved motion of the jet components, which is associated with its radio light curve. In addition, observations of the quasar NRAO 150 have revealed a core–jet structure wobbling with a high angular speed. In this paper, the phenomena displayed in these two different sources are interpreted as the precession of a bent jet. In such a scenario, hot spots reproduced at different separations from the core precess on the same precession cone, in which different components correspond to different propagation times to the observer. By fitting the kinematics of the components of XTE J1752-223 and its light curve with a curved pattern of precession period 314 days, we find that the propagation time can make an earlier event appear later, and the jet axis can oscillate during its precession. Simulating the quasar NRAO 150 with the same scenario reveals that the knots at larger separation from the core precess at a slower speed than those closer in. A possible mechanism relating to the cooling time of a component is proposed. These three new results are of importance in understanding the physics underlying the curved jet as well as the activity of the central engine of different black hole systems.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/149},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • We report on the discovery and monitoring observations of a new galactic black hole (BH) candidate XTE J1752-223 by Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The new source appeared on the X-ray sky on 2009 October 21 and was active for almost 8 months. Phenomenologically, the source exhibited the low-hard/high-soft spectral state bi-modality and the variability evolution during the state transition that matches standard behavior expected from a stellar mass BH binary. We model the energy spectrum throughout the outburst using a generic Comptonization model assuming that part of the input soft radiation in the form of a blackbody spectrum getsmore » reprocessed in the Comptonizing medium. We follow the evolution of fractional root-mean-square (rms) variability in the RXTE/PCA energy band with the source spectral state and conclude that broadband variability is strongly correlated with the source hardness (or Comptonized fraction). We follow changes in the energy distribution of rms variability during the low-hard state and the state transition, and find further evidence that variable emission is strongly concentrated in the power-law spectral component. We discuss the implication of our results to the Comptonization regimes during different spectral states. Correlations of spectral and variability properties provide measurements of the BH mass and distance to the source. The spectral-timing correlation scaling technique applied to the RXTE observations during the hard-to-soft state transition indicates a mass of the BH in XTE J1752-223 between 8 and 11 solar masses and a distance to the source of about 3.5 kpc.« less
  • Galactic black hole transients show many interesting phenomena during outburst decays. We present simultaneous X-ray (RXTE, Swift, and INTEGRAL), and optical/near-infrared (O/NIR) observations (SMARTS) of the X-ray transient XTE J1752-223 during its outburst decay in 2010. The multiwavelength observations over 150 days in 2010 cover the transition from soft to hard spectral state. We discuss the evolution of radio emission with respect to the O/NIR light curve which shows several flares. One of those flares is bright and long, starting about 60 days after the transition in X-ray timing properties. During this flare, the radio spectral index becomes harder. Othermore » smaller flares occur along with the X-ray timing transition, and also right after the detection of the radio core. We discuss the significances of these flares. Furthermore, using the simultaneous broadband X-ray spectra including INTEGRAL, we find that a high energy cut-off with a folding energy near 250 keV is necessary around the time that the compact jet is forming. The broadband spectrum can be fitted equally well with a Comptonization model. In addition, using photoelectric absorption edges in the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer X-ray spectra and the extinction of red clump giants in the direction of the source, we find a lower limit on the distance of >5 kpc.« less
  • The black hole (BH) candidate XTE J1908+094 went into outburst for the first time since 2003 in 2013 October. We report on an observation with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and monitoring observations with Swift during the outburst. NuSTAR caught the source in the soft state: the spectra show a broad relativistic iron line, and the light curves reveal a ∼40 ks flare, with the count rate peaking about 40% above the non-flare level and with significant spectral variation. A model combining a multi-temperature thermal component, a power law, and a reflection component with an iron line provides amore » good description of the NuSTAR spectrum. Although relativistic broadening of the iron line is observed, it is not possible to constrain the BH spin with these data. The variability of the power-law component, which can also be modeled as a Comptonization component, is responsible for the flux and spectral change during the flare, suggesting that changes in the corona (or possibly continued jet activity) are the likely cause of the flare.« less
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar J092712.65+294344.0 has been proposed as a candidate for a supermassive black hole ({approx}10{sup 8.8} M {sub sun}) ejected at high speed from the host galactic nucleus by gravitational radiation recoil, or alternatively for a supermassive black hole binary. This is based on a blueshift of 2650 km s{sup -1} of the broad emission lines ('b-system') relative to the narrow emission lines ('r-system') presumed to reflect the galaxy velocity. New observations with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) confirm the essential features of the spectrum. We note a third redshift system, characterized by weak, narrow emissionmore » lines of [O III] and [O II] at an intermediate velocity 900 km s{sup -1} redward of the broad-line velocity ('i-system'). A composite spectrum of SDSS QSOs similar to J0927+2943 illustrates the feasibility of detecting the calcium K absorption line in spectra of sufficient quality. The i-system may represent the QSO host galaxy or a companion. Photoionization requires the black hole to be {approx}3 kpc from the r-system emitting gas, implying that we are observing the system only 10{sup 6} yr after the recoil event and contributing to the low probability of observing such a system. The HET observations give an upper limit of 10 km s{sup -1} per year on the rate of change of the velocity difference between the r- and b-systems, constraining the orbital phase in the binary model. These considerations and the presence of a cluster of galaxies apparently containing J0927+2943 favor the idea that this system represents a superposition of two active galactic nuclei.« less
  • Double-peaked emission lines are believed to be originated from accretion disks around supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and about 3% of z < 0.33 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are found to be double-peaked emitters. The quasar SDSS J153636.22+044127.0 has recently been identified with peculiar broad-line emission systems exhibiting multiple redshifts. We decompose the Halpha and Hbeta profiles into a circular Keplerian disk-line component and other Gaussian components. We propose that the system is both a double-peaked emitter and a binary SMBH system, where the extra flux in the blue peaks of the broad lines comes from the region around the secondarymore » black hole. We suggest that such black hole binary systems might also exist in many known double-peaked emitters, where the tidal torques from the secondary black hole clear the outer region of the disk around the primary black hole, similar to the gap in a protostellar disk due to the process of planetary migration, and might also stimulate the formation of a vertical extended source in the inner region around the primary which illuminates the disk. However, most secondary SMBHs in such systems might be too small to maintain a detectable broad-line region (BLR), so that the disk line from the primary dominates.« less