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Title: Characterization of the Wolf 1061 Planetary System

Abstract

A critical component of exoplanetary studies is an exhaustive characterization of the host star, from which the planetary properties are frequently derived. Of particular value are the radius, temperature, and luminosity, which are key stellar parameters for studies of transit and habitability science. Here we present the results of new observations of Wolf 1061, known to host three super-Earths. Our observations from the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy interferometric array provide a direct stellar radius measurement of 0.3207±0.0088 R{sub ⊙}, from which we calculate the effective temperature and luminosity using spectral energy distribution models. We obtained 7 yr of precise, automated photometry that reveals the correct stellar rotation period of 89.3±1.8 days, finds no evidence of photometric transits, and confirms that the radial velocity signals are not due to stellar activity. Finally, our stellar properties are used to calculate the extent of the Habitable Zone (HZ) for the Wolf 1061 system, for which the optimistic boundaries are 0.09–0.23 au. Our simulations of the planetary orbital dynamics show that the eccentricity of the HZ planet oscillates to values as high as ∼0.15 as it exchanges angular momentum with the other planets in the system.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)
  2. Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)
  3. Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States)
  4. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)
  5. Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663905
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANGULAR MOMENTUM; ASTRONOMY; ENERGY SPECTRA; HOST; LUMINOSITY; PHOTOMETRY; PLANETS; RADIAL VELOCITY; RESOLUTION; ROTATION; SIMULATION; STARS; STELLAR ACTIVITY

Citation Formats

Kane, Stephen R., Waters, Miranda A., Von Braun, Kaspar, Henry, Gregory W., Boyajian, Tabetha S., and Mann, Andrew W., E-mail: skane@sfsu.edu. Characterization of the Wolf 1061 Planetary System. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/200.
Kane, Stephen R., Waters, Miranda A., Von Braun, Kaspar, Henry, Gregory W., Boyajian, Tabetha S., & Mann, Andrew W., E-mail: skane@sfsu.edu. Characterization of the Wolf 1061 Planetary System. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/200.
Kane, Stephen R., Waters, Miranda A., Von Braun, Kaspar, Henry, Gregory W., Boyajian, Tabetha S., and Mann, Andrew W., E-mail: skane@sfsu.edu. Wed . "Characterization of the Wolf 1061 Planetary System". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/200.
@article{osti_22663905,
title = {Characterization of the Wolf 1061 Planetary System},
author = {Kane, Stephen R. and Waters, Miranda A. and Von Braun, Kaspar and Henry, Gregory W. and Boyajian, Tabetha S. and Mann, Andrew W., E-mail: skane@sfsu.edu},
abstractNote = {A critical component of exoplanetary studies is an exhaustive characterization of the host star, from which the planetary properties are frequently derived. Of particular value are the radius, temperature, and luminosity, which are key stellar parameters for studies of transit and habitability science. Here we present the results of new observations of Wolf 1061, known to host three super-Earths. Our observations from the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy interferometric array provide a direct stellar radius measurement of 0.3207±0.0088 R{sub ⊙}, from which we calculate the effective temperature and luminosity using spectral energy distribution models. We obtained 7 yr of precise, automated photometry that reveals the correct stellar rotation period of 89.3±1.8 days, finds no evidence of photometric transits, and confirms that the radial velocity signals are not due to stellar activity. Finally, our stellar properties are used to calculate the extent of the Habitable Zone (HZ) for the Wolf 1061 system, for which the optimistic boundaries are 0.09–0.23 au. Our simulations of the planetary orbital dynamics show that the eccentricity of the HZ planet oscillates to values as high as ∼0.15 as it exchanges angular momentum with the other planets in the system.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/200},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf 1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888 days (Wolf 1061b), a 4.25 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867 days (Wolf 1061c), and a likely 5.21 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274 days (Wolf 1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867 day planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274 day planetmore » falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation FWHMs, calcium H and K indices, NaD indices, or Hα indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploitation of the archival HARPS data for the detection of planets at extremely low amplitudes.« less
  • We present new Spitzer/IRS spectra of two hot R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, one in the Galaxy, V348 Sgr, and one lying in the Large Magellanic Cloud, HV 2671. These two objects may constitute a link between the RCB stars and the late Wolf-Rayet ([WCL]) class of central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe), such as CPD -56{sup 0} 8032, that has little or no hydrogen in their atmospheres. HV 2671 and V348 Sgr are members of a rare subclass that has significantly higher effective temperatures than most RCB stars, but shares the traits of hydrogen deficiency and dust formation thatmore » define the cooler RCB stars. The [WC] CSPN star, CPD -56{sup 0} 8032, displays evidence of dual-dust chemistry showing both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and crystalline silicates in its mid-IR spectrum. HV 2671 shows strong PAH emission but no sign of having crystalline silicates. The spectrum of V348 Sgr is very different from that of CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 and HV 2671. The PAH emission seen strongly in the other two stars is not present. Instead, the spectrum is dominated by a broad emission centered at about 8.2 {mu}m. This feature is not identified with either PAHs or silicates. Several other cool RCB stars, novae, and post-asymptotic giant branch stars show similar features in their IR spectra. The mid-IR spectrum of CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 shows emission features that may be associated with C{sub 60}. The other two stars do not show evidence of C{sub 60}. The different nature of the dust around these stars does not help us in establishing further links that may indicate a common origin. HV 2671 has also been detected by Herschel/PACS and SPIRE. V348 Sgr and CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 have been detected by AKARI/Far-Infrared Surveyor. These data were combined with Spitzer, IRAS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and other photometry to produce their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the visible to the far-IR. Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling was used to study the circumstellar dust around these stars. HV 2671 and CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 require both a flared inner disk with warm dust and an extended diffuse envelope with cold dust to fit their SEDs. The SED of V348 Sgr can be fit with a much smaller disk and envelope. The cold dust in the extended diffuse envelopes inferred around HV 2671 and CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 may consist of interstellar medium swept up during mass-loss episodes.« less
  • K2-19 (EPIC201505350) is an interesting planetary system in which two transiting planets with radii ∼7 R{sub ⊕} (inner planet b) and ∼4 R{sub ⊕} (outer planet c) have orbits that are nearly in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance. Here, we present results of ground-based follow-up observations for the K2-19 planetary system. We have performed high-dispersion spectroscopy and high-contrast adaptive-optics imaging of the host star with the HDS and HiCIAO on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We find that the host star is a relatively old (≥8 Gyr) late G-type star (T{sub eff} ∼ 5350 K, M{sub s} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}, and R{sub s} ∼ 0.9 R{submore » ⊙}). We do not find any contaminating faint objects near the host star that could be responsible for (or dilute) the transit signals. We have also conducted transit follow-up photometry for the inner planet with KeplerCam on the FLWO 1.2 m telescope, TRAPPISTCAM on the TRAPPIST 0.6 m telescope, and MuSCAT on the OAO 1.88 m telescope. We confirm the presence of transit timing variations (TTVs), as previously reported by Armstrong and coworkers. We model the observed TTVs of the inner planet using the synodic chopping formulae given by Deck and Agol. We find two statistically indistinguishable solutions for which the period ratios (P{sub c}/P{sub b}) are located slightly above and below the exact 3:2 commensurability. Despite the degeneracy, we derive the orbital period of the inner planet P{sub b} ∼ 7.921 days and the mass of the outer planet M{sub c} ∼ 20 M{sub ⊕}. Additional transit photometry (especially for the outer planet) as well as precise radial-velocity measurements would be helpful to break the degeneracy and to determine the mass of the inner planet.« less