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Title: “Dandelion” Filament Eruption and Coronal Waves Associated with a Solar Flare on 2011 February 16

Abstract

Coronal disturbances associated with solar flares, such as H α Moreton waves, X-ray waves, and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal waves, are discussed herein in relation to magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves or shocks in the corona. To understand the mechanism of coronal disturbances, full-disk solar observations with high spatial and temporal resolution over multiple wavelengths are of crucial importance. We observed a filament eruption, whose shape is like a “dandelion,” associated with the M1.6 flare that occurred on 2011 February 16 in H α images taken by the Flare Monitoring Telescope at Ica University, Peru. We derive the three-dimensional velocity field of the erupting filament. We also identify winking filaments that are located far from the flare site in the H α images, whereas no Moreton wave is observed. By comparing the temporal evolution of the winking filaments with those of the coronal wave seen in the EUV images data taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead , we confirm that the winking filaments were activated by the EUV coronal wave.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [4]; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [5]
  1. Geophysical Institute of Peru, Calle Badajoz 169, Mayorazgo IV Etapa, Ate Vitarte, Lima (Peru)
  2. Centro de Investigación del Estudio de la Actividad Solar y sus Efectos Sobre la Tierra, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional San Luis Gonzaga de Ica, Av. Los Maestros S/N, Ica (Peru)
  3. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)
  4. Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan)
  5. Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto, 607-8471 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663874
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 836; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CHROMOSPHERE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DISTURBANCES; EVOLUTION; EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; RESOLUTION; SHOCK WAVES; SOLAR CORONA; SOLAR FLARES; SUN; TELESCOPES; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; VELOCITY; WAVELENGTHS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Cabezas, Denis P., Ishitsuka, Mutsumi, Ishitsuka, José K., Martínez, Lurdes M., Buleje, Yovanny J., Morita, Satoshi, Asai, Ayumi, UeNo, Satoru, Ishii, Takako T., Kitai, Reizaburo, Takasao, Shinsuke, Yoshinaga, Yusuke, Otsuji, Kenichi, and Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: denis@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp. “Dandelion” Filament Eruption and Coronal Waves Associated with a Solar Flare on 2011 February 16. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/33.
Cabezas, Denis P., Ishitsuka, Mutsumi, Ishitsuka, José K., Martínez, Lurdes M., Buleje, Yovanny J., Morita, Satoshi, Asai, Ayumi, UeNo, Satoru, Ishii, Takako T., Kitai, Reizaburo, Takasao, Shinsuke, Yoshinaga, Yusuke, Otsuji, Kenichi, & Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: denis@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp. “Dandelion” Filament Eruption and Coronal Waves Associated with a Solar Flare on 2011 February 16. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/33.
Cabezas, Denis P., Ishitsuka, Mutsumi, Ishitsuka, José K., Martínez, Lurdes M., Buleje, Yovanny J., Morita, Satoshi, Asai, Ayumi, UeNo, Satoru, Ishii, Takako T., Kitai, Reizaburo, Takasao, Shinsuke, Yoshinaga, Yusuke, Otsuji, Kenichi, and Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: denis@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp. Fri . "“Dandelion” Filament Eruption and Coronal Waves Associated with a Solar Flare on 2011 February 16". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/33.
@article{osti_22663874,
title = {“Dandelion” Filament Eruption and Coronal Waves Associated with a Solar Flare on 2011 February 16},
author = {Cabezas, Denis P. and Ishitsuka, Mutsumi and Ishitsuka, José K. and Martínez, Lurdes M. and Buleje, Yovanny J. and Morita, Satoshi and Asai, Ayumi and UeNo, Satoru and Ishii, Takako T. and Kitai, Reizaburo and Takasao, Shinsuke and Yoshinaga, Yusuke and Otsuji, Kenichi and Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: denis@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {Coronal disturbances associated with solar flares, such as H α Moreton waves, X-ray waves, and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal waves, are discussed herein in relation to magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves or shocks in the corona. To understand the mechanism of coronal disturbances, full-disk solar observations with high spatial and temporal resolution over multiple wavelengths are of crucial importance. We observed a filament eruption, whose shape is like a “dandelion,” associated with the M1.6 flare that occurred on 2011 February 16 in H α images taken by the Flare Monitoring Telescope at Ica University, Peru. We derive the three-dimensional velocity field of the erupting filament. We also identify winking filaments that are located far from the flare site in the H α images, whereas no Moreton wave is observed. By comparing the temporal evolution of the winking filaments with those of the coronal wave seen in the EUV images data taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead , we confirm that the winking filaments were activated by the EUV coronal wave.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/33},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 836,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • For the first time, the kinematic evolution of a coronal wave over the entire solar surface is studied. Full Sun maps can be made by combining images from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory satellites, Ahead and Behind, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, thanks to the wide angular separation between them. We study the propagation of a coronal wave, also known as the 'Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope' wave, and its interaction with a coronal hole (CH) resulting in secondary waves and/or reflection and transmission. We explore the possibility of the wave obeying the law of reflection. In a detailed example, wemore » find that a loop arcade at the CH boundary cascades and oscillates as a result of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave passage and triggers a wave directed eastward that appears to have reflected. We find that the speed of this wave decelerates to an asymptotic value, which is less than half of the primary EUV wave speed. Thanks to the full Sun coverage we are able to determine that part of the primary wave is transmitted through the CH. This is the first observation of its kind. The kinematic measurements of the reflected and transmitted wave tracks are consistent with a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic wave interpretation. Eventually, all wave tracks decelerate and disappear at a distance. A possible scenario of the whole process is that the wave is initially driven by the expanding coronal mass ejection and subsequently decouples from the driver and then propagates at the local fast-mode speed.« less
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  • The 2011 February 15 X2.2 flare and associated Earth-directed halo coronal mass ejection were observed in unprecedented detail with high resolution in spatial, temporal, and thermal dimensions by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, as well as by instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft, then at near-quadrature relative to the Sun-Earth line. These observations enable us to see expanding loops from a flux-rope-like structure over the shearing polarity-inversion line between the central {delta}-spot groups of AR 11158, developing a propagating coronal front ('EIT wave'), and eventually forming the coronal mass ejection moving into the inner heliosphere.more » The observations support the interpretation that all of these features, including the 'EIT wave', are signatures of an expanding volume traced by loops (much larger than the flux rope only), surrounded by a moving front rather than predominantly wave-like perturbations; this interpretation is supported by previously published MHD models for active-region and global scales. The lateral expansion of the eruption is limited to the local helmet-streamer structure and halts at the edges of a large-scale domain of connectivity (in the process exciting loop oscillations at the edge of the southern polar coronal hole). The AIA observations reveal that plasma warming occurs within the expansion front as it propagates over quiet Sun areas. This warming causes dimming in the 171 A (Fe IX and Fe X) channel and brightening in the 193 and 211 A (Fe XII-XIV) channels along the entire front, while there is weak 131 A (Fe VIII and Fe XXI) emission in some directions. An analysis of the AIA response functions shows that sections of the front running over the quiet Sun are consistent with adiabatic warming; other sections may require additional heating which MHD modeling suggests could be caused by Joule dissipation. Although for the events studied here the effects of volumetric expansion are much more obvious than true wave phenomena, we discuss how different magnetic environments within and around the erupting region can lead to the signatures of either or both of these aspects.« less
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