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Title: Long-lived Dust Asymmetries at Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks

Abstract

A number of transition disks exhibit significant azimuthal asymmetries in thermal dust emission. One possible origin for these asymmetries is dust trapping in vortices formed at the edges of dead zones. We carry out high-resolution, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario, including the effects of dust feedback. We find that, although feedback weakens the vortices and slows down the process of dust accumulation, the dust distribution in the disk can nonetheless remain asymmetric for many thousands of orbits. We show that even after 10{sup 4} orbits, or 2.5 Myr when scaled to the parameters of Oph IRS 48 (a significant fraction of its age), the dust is not dispersed into an axisymmetric ring, in contrast to the case of a vortex formed by a planet. This is because accumulation of mass at the dead zone edge constantly replenishes the vortex, preventing it from being fully destroyed. We produce synthetic dust emission images using our simulation results. We find that multiple small clumps of dust may be distributed azimuthally. These clumps, if not resolved from one another, appear as a single large feature. A defining characteristic of a disk with a dead zone edge is that an asymmetric feature is accompaniedmore » by a ring of dust located about twice as far from the central star.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)
  2. Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663856
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASYMMETRY; AXIAL SYMMETRY; DISTRIBUTION; DUSTS; FEEDBACK; HYDRODYNAMICS; MASS; ORBITS; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; RESOLUTION; RINGS; SIMULATION; STARS; TRAPPING; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; VORTICES

Citation Formats

Miranda, Ryan, Li, Hui, Li, Shengtai, and Jin, Sheng, E-mail: rjm456@cornell.edu. Long-lived Dust Asymmetries at Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/118.
Miranda, Ryan, Li, Hui, Li, Shengtai, & Jin, Sheng, E-mail: rjm456@cornell.edu. Long-lived Dust Asymmetries at Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/118.
Miranda, Ryan, Li, Hui, Li, Shengtai, and Jin, Sheng, E-mail: rjm456@cornell.edu. Wed . "Long-lived Dust Asymmetries at Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/118.
@article{osti_22663856,
title = {Long-lived Dust Asymmetries at Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks},
author = {Miranda, Ryan and Li, Hui and Li, Shengtai and Jin, Sheng, E-mail: rjm456@cornell.edu},
abstractNote = {A number of transition disks exhibit significant azimuthal asymmetries in thermal dust emission. One possible origin for these asymmetries is dust trapping in vortices formed at the edges of dead zones. We carry out high-resolution, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario, including the effects of dust feedback. We find that, although feedback weakens the vortices and slows down the process of dust accumulation, the dust distribution in the disk can nonetheless remain asymmetric for many thousands of orbits. We show that even after 10{sup 4} orbits, or 2.5 Myr when scaled to the parameters of Oph IRS 48 (a significant fraction of its age), the dust is not dispersed into an axisymmetric ring, in contrast to the case of a vortex formed by a planet. This is because accumulation of mass at the dead zone edge constantly replenishes the vortex, preventing it from being fully destroyed. We produce synthetic dust emission images using our simulation results. We find that multiple small clumps of dust may be distributed azimuthally. These clumps, if not resolved from one another, appear as a single large feature. A defining characteristic of a disk with a dead zone edge is that an asymmetric feature is accompanied by a ring of dust located about twice as far from the central star.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/118},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}