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Title: GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations

Abstract

We investigate giant molecular cloud collisions and their ability to induce gravitational instability and thus star formation. This mechanism may be a major driver of star formation activity in galactic disks. We carry out a series of 3D, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments and clumps. Heating and cooling functions are implemented based on photo-dissociation region models that span the atomic-to-molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. The clouds are initialized with supersonic turbulence and a range of magnetic field strengths and orientations. Collisions at various velocities and impact parameters are investigated. Comparing and contrasting colliding and non-colliding cases, we characterize morphologies of dense gas, magnetic field structure, cloud kinematic signatures, and cloud dynamics. We present key observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, especially: relative orientations between magnetic fields and density structures, like filaments; {sup 13}CO( J = 2-1), {sup 13}CO( J = 3-2), and {sup 12}CO( J = 8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra; and cloud virial parameters. We compare these results to observed Galactic clouds.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)
  2. National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)
  3. School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds (United Kingdom)
  4. Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)
  5. Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663849
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CARBON 12; CARBON 13; CARBON MONOXIDE; COLLISIONS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DENSITY; DISSOCIATION; GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY; HEATING; IMPACT PARAMETER; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; SIMULATION; SPECTRA; STARS; TURBULENCE; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Wu, Benjamin, Tan, Jonathan C., Nakamura, Fumitaka, Loo, Sven Van, Christie, Duncan, and Collins, David. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/137.
Wu, Benjamin, Tan, Jonathan C., Nakamura, Fumitaka, Loo, Sven Van, Christie, Duncan, & Collins, David. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/137.
Wu, Benjamin, Tan, Jonathan C., Nakamura, Fumitaka, Loo, Sven Van, Christie, Duncan, and Collins, David. Wed . "GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/137.
@article{osti_22663849,
title = {GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations},
author = {Wu, Benjamin and Tan, Jonathan C. and Nakamura, Fumitaka and Loo, Sven Van and Christie, Duncan and Collins, David},
abstractNote = {We investigate giant molecular cloud collisions and their ability to induce gravitational instability and thus star formation. This mechanism may be a major driver of star formation activity in galactic disks. We carry out a series of 3D, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments and clumps. Heating and cooling functions are implemented based on photo-dissociation region models that span the atomic-to-molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. The clouds are initialized with supersonic turbulence and a range of magnetic field strengths and orientations. Collisions at various velocities and impact parameters are investigated. Comparing and contrasting colliding and non-colliding cases, we characterize morphologies of dense gas, magnetic field structure, cloud kinematic signatures, and cloud dynamics. We present key observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, especially: relative orientations between magnetic fields and density structures, like filaments; {sup 13}CO( J = 2-1), {sup 13}CO( J = 3-2), and {sup 12}CO( J = 8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra; and cloud virial parameters. We compare these results to observed Galactic clouds.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/137},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}