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Title: Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections

Abstract

Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory , we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanied by post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. This likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, which resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that forms a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the originmore » of twin CMEs and show that the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, 264209 Weihai (China)
  2. Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)
  3. School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 210023 Nanjing (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663785
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 836; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CANCELLATION; COLLISIONS; CONFINEMENT; ERUPTION; FILAMENTS; INTERACTIONS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIC FLUX; MASS; PLASMA; SOLAR FLARES; SUN

Citation Formats

Zheng, Ruisheng, Chen, Yao, Wang, Bing, Du, Guohui, Li, Chuanyang, Zhang, Qingmin, and Yang, Kai, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn. Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C38.
Zheng, Ruisheng, Chen, Yao, Wang, Bing, Du, Guohui, Li, Chuanyang, Zhang, Qingmin, & Yang, Kai, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn. Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C38.
Zheng, Ruisheng, Chen, Yao, Wang, Bing, Du, Guohui, Li, Chuanyang, Zhang, Qingmin, and Yang, Kai, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn. Mon . "Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C38.
@article{osti_22663785,
title = {Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections},
author = {Zheng, Ruisheng and Chen, Yao and Wang, Bing and Du, Guohui and Li, Chuanyang and Zhang, Qingmin and Yang, Kai, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory , we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanied by post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. This likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, which resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that forms a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the origin of twin CMEs and show that the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C38},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 836,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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