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Title: The Candidate Progenitor of the Type IIn SN 2010jl Is Not an Optically Luminous Star

Abstract

A blue source in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope ( HST )/Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images falls within the 5 σ astrometric error circle (∼0.″24) derived from post-explosion ground-based imaging of SN 2010jl. At the time the ground-based astrometry was published, however, the SN had not faded sufficiently for post-explosion HST follow-up observations to determine a more precise astrometric solution and/or confirm if the pre-explosion source had disappeared, both of which are necessary to ultimately disentangle the possible progenitor scenarios. Here we present HST /WFC3 imaging of the SN 2010jl field obtained in 2014, 2015, and 2016 when the SN had faded sufficiently to allow for new constraints on the progenitor. The SN, which is still detected in the new images, is offset by 0.″061 ± 0.″008 (15 ± 2 pc) from the underlying and extended source of emission that contributes at least partially, if not entirely, to the blue source previously suggested as the candidate progenitor in the WFPC2 data. This point alone rules out the possibility that the blue source in the pre-explosion images is the exploding star, but may instead suggest an association with a young (<5–6 Myr) cluster and still argues for a massive (>30 Mmore » {sub ⊙}) progenitor. We obtain new upper limits on the flux from a single star at the SN position in the pre-explosion WFPC2 and Spitzer /IRAC images that may ultimately be used to constrain the progenitor properties.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [4]; ; ;  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]
  1. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  2. IPAC/Caltech, Mailcode 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  3. Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
  4. Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  5. Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)
  6. CRESST/UMBC/GSFC Code 665, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt MD, 20771 (United States)
  7. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  8. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663766
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 836; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DUSTS; EMISSION; EXPLOSIONS; LIMITING VALUES; LUMINOSITY; SPACE; SUPERNOVAE; TELESCOPES; TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

Citation Formats

Fox, Ori D., Dyk, Schuyler D. Van, Dwek, Eli, Smith, Nathan, Andrews, Jennifer, Filippenko, Alexei V., Kelly, Patrick L., Shivvers, Isaac, Arendt, Richard G., Foley, Ryan J., and Miller, Adam A., E-mail: ofox@stsci.edu. The Candidate Progenitor of the Type IIn SN 2010jl Is Not an Optically Luminous Star. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/2/222.
Fox, Ori D., Dyk, Schuyler D. Van, Dwek, Eli, Smith, Nathan, Andrews, Jennifer, Filippenko, Alexei V., Kelly, Patrick L., Shivvers, Isaac, Arendt, Richard G., Foley, Ryan J., & Miller, Adam A., E-mail: ofox@stsci.edu. The Candidate Progenitor of the Type IIn SN 2010jl Is Not an Optically Luminous Star. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/2/222.
Fox, Ori D., Dyk, Schuyler D. Van, Dwek, Eli, Smith, Nathan, Andrews, Jennifer, Filippenko, Alexei V., Kelly, Patrick L., Shivvers, Isaac, Arendt, Richard G., Foley, Ryan J., and Miller, Adam A., E-mail: ofox@stsci.edu. Mon . "The Candidate Progenitor of the Type IIn SN 2010jl Is Not an Optically Luminous Star". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/2/222.
@article{osti_22663766,
title = {The Candidate Progenitor of the Type IIn SN 2010jl Is Not an Optically Luminous Star},
author = {Fox, Ori D. and Dyk, Schuyler D. Van and Dwek, Eli and Smith, Nathan and Andrews, Jennifer and Filippenko, Alexei V. and Kelly, Patrick L. and Shivvers, Isaac and Arendt, Richard G. and Foley, Ryan J. and Miller, Adam A., E-mail: ofox@stsci.edu},
abstractNote = {A blue source in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope ( HST )/Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images falls within the 5 σ astrometric error circle (∼0.″24) derived from post-explosion ground-based imaging of SN 2010jl. At the time the ground-based astrometry was published, however, the SN had not faded sufficiently for post-explosion HST follow-up observations to determine a more precise astrometric solution and/or confirm if the pre-explosion source had disappeared, both of which are necessary to ultimately disentangle the possible progenitor scenarios. Here we present HST /WFC3 imaging of the SN 2010jl field obtained in 2014, 2015, and 2016 when the SN had faded sufficiently to allow for new constraints on the progenitor. The SN, which is still detected in the new images, is offset by 0.″061 ± 0.″008 (15 ± 2 pc) from the underlying and extended source of emission that contributes at least partially, if not entirely, to the blue source previously suggested as the candidate progenitor in the WFPC2 data. This point alone rules out the possibility that the blue source in the pre-explosion images is the exploding star, but may instead suggest an association with a young (<5–6 Myr) cluster and still argues for a massive (>30 M {sub ⊙}) progenitor. We obtain new upper limits on the flux from a single star at the SN position in the pre-explosion WFPC2 and Spitzer /IRAC images that may ultimately be used to constrain the progenitor properties.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/836/2/222},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 836,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • The bright, nearby, recently discovered supernova (SN) 2010jl is a luminous Type IIn SN. Here, we report archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of its host galaxy UGC 5189A taken roughly 10 yr prior to explosion, as well as early-time optical spectra of the SN. The HST images reveal a luminous, blue point source at the position of the SN, with an absolute magnitude of -12.0 in the F300W filter. If it is not just a chance alignment, the source at the SN position could be (1) a massive young (<6 Myr) star cluster in which the SN resided, (2)more » a quiescent, luminous blue star with an apparent temperature around 14,000 K, (3) a star caught during a bright outburst akin to those of luminous blue variables, or (4) a combination of option (1) and option (2) or (3). Although we cannot confidently choose between these possibilities with the present data, any of them imply that the progenitor of SN 2010jl had an initial mass above 30 M{sub sun}. This reinforces mounting evidence that many SNe IIn result from very massive stars, that massive stars can produce visible SNe without collapsing quietly to black holes, and that massive stars can sometimes retain their H envelopes until shortly before explosion. Standard stellar evolution models fail to account for these observed properties.« less
  • Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observations of the Type IIn supernova (SN) 2010jl are analyzed, including photometry and spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, optical, and near-IR bands, 26-1128 days after first detection. At maximum, the bolometric luminosity was ∼3 × 10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1} and even at 850 days exceeds 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}. A near-IR excess, dominating after 400 days, probably originates in dust in the circumstellar medium (CSM). The total radiated energy is ≳ 6.5 × 10{sup 50} erg, excluding the dust component. The spectral lines can be separated into one broad component that is due to electron scatteringmore » and one narrow with expansion velocity ∼100 km s{sup –1} from the CSM. The broad component is initially symmetric around zero velocity but becomes blueshifted after ∼50 days, while remaining symmetric about a shifted centroid velocity. Dust absorption in the ejecta is unlikely to explain the line shifts, and we attribute the shift instead to acceleration by the SN radiation. From the optical lines and the X-ray and dust properties, there is strong evidence for large-scale asymmetries in the CSM. The ultraviolet lines indicate CNO processing in the progenitor, while the optical shows a number of narrow coronal lines excited by the X-rays. The bolometric light curve is consistent with a radiative shock in an r {sup –2} CSM with a mass-loss rate of M-dot ∼0.1  M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. The total mass lost is ≳ 3 M {sub ☉}. These properties are consistent with the SN expanding into a CSM characteristic of a luminous blue variable progenitor with a bipolar geometry. The apparent absence of nuclear processing is attributed to a CSM that is still opaque to electron scattering.« less
  • Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newlymore » formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ∼1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ∼(7.5-8.5) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (∼< 0.1 μm, and most likely ∼< 0.01 μm). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ∼10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ∼> 3 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ∼> 0.02 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ∼100 km s{sup –1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.« less
  • SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn supernova (SN) which showed a significant infrared (IR) excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m and JHK observations of SN 2010jl {approx}90 days post-explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code,more » we have estimated that between 0.03 and 0.35 M{sub sun} of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 x 10{sup 17} cm away from the SN and inclined between 60 deg. and 80 deg. to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day {approx} 450. It is likely this dust was created in a luminous blue variable (LBV) like mass-loss event of more than 3 M{sub sun}, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as {eta} Carinae.« less
  • We report two epochs of Chandra-ACIS X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the nearby bright Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl, taken around two months and then a year after the explosion. The majority of the X-ray emission in both spectra is characterized by a high temperature ({approx}> 10 keV) and is likely to be from the forward shocked region resulting from circumstellar interaction. The absorption column density in the first spectrum is high ({approx}10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}), more than three orders of magnitude higher than the Galactic absorption column, and we attribute it to absorption by circumstellar matter. In the second epochmore » observation, the column density has decreased by a factor of three, as expected for shock propagation in the circumstellar medium. The unabsorbed 0.2-10 keV luminosity at both epochs is {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}. The 6.4 keV Fe line clearly present in the first spectrum is not detected in the second spectrum. The strength of the fluorescent line is roughly that expected for the column density of circumstellar gas, provided the Fe is not highly ionized. There is also evidence for an absorbed power-law component in both spectra, which we attribute to a background ultraluminous X-ray source.« less