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Title: Residual Gas and Dust around Transition Objects and Weak T Tauri Stars

Abstract

Residual gas in disks around young stars can spin down stars, circularize the orbits of terrestrial planets, and whisk away the dusty debris that is expected to serve as a signpost of terrestrial planet formation. We have carried out a sensitive search for residual gas and dust in the terrestrial planet region surrounding young stars ranging in age from a few to ∼10 Myr. Using high-resolution 4.7 μ m spectra of transition objects (TOs) and weak T Tauri stars, we searched for weak continuum excesses and CO fundamental emission, after making a careful correction for the stellar contribution to the observed spectrum. We find that the CO emission from TOs is weaker and located farther from the star than CO emission from nontransition T Tauri stars with similar stellar accretion rates. The difference is possibly the result of chemical and/or dynamical effects (i.e., a low CO abundance or close-in low-mass planets). The weak T Tauri stars show no CO fundamental emission down to low flux levels (5 × 10{sup −20} to 10{sup −18} W m{sup −2}). We illustrate how our results can be used to constrain the residual disk gas content in these systems and discuss their potential implications formore » star and planet formation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States)
  2. National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)
  3. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663752
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 836; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ABUNDANCE; CARBON; CARBON MONOXIDE; CORRECTIONS; DUSTS; EMISSION; GASES; INTERSTELLAR SPACE; MASS; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; RESOLUTION; SPECTRA; SPIN; T TAURI STARS

Citation Formats

Doppmann, Greg W., Najita, Joan R., and Carr, John S., E-mail: gdoppmann@keck.hawaii.edu, E-mail: najita@noao.edu, E-mail: carr@nrl.navy.mil. Residual Gas and Dust around Transition Objects and Weak T Tauri Stars. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C3C.
Doppmann, Greg W., Najita, Joan R., & Carr, John S., E-mail: gdoppmann@keck.hawaii.edu, E-mail: najita@noao.edu, E-mail: carr@nrl.navy.mil. Residual Gas and Dust around Transition Objects and Weak T Tauri Stars. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C3C.
Doppmann, Greg W., Najita, Joan R., and Carr, John S., E-mail: gdoppmann@keck.hawaii.edu, E-mail: najita@noao.edu, E-mail: carr@nrl.navy.mil. Mon . "Residual Gas and Dust around Transition Objects and Weak T Tauri Stars". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C3C.
@article{osti_22663752,
title = {Residual Gas and Dust around Transition Objects and Weak T Tauri Stars},
author = {Doppmann, Greg W. and Najita, Joan R. and Carr, John S., E-mail: gdoppmann@keck.hawaii.edu, E-mail: najita@noao.edu, E-mail: carr@nrl.navy.mil},
abstractNote = {Residual gas in disks around young stars can spin down stars, circularize the orbits of terrestrial planets, and whisk away the dusty debris that is expected to serve as a signpost of terrestrial planet formation. We have carried out a sensitive search for residual gas and dust in the terrestrial planet region surrounding young stars ranging in age from a few to ∼10 Myr. Using high-resolution 4.7 μ m spectra of transition objects (TOs) and weak T Tauri stars, we searched for weak continuum excesses and CO fundamental emission, after making a careful correction for the stellar contribution to the observed spectrum. We find that the CO emission from TOs is weaker and located farther from the star than CO emission from nontransition T Tauri stars with similar stellar accretion rates. The difference is possibly the result of chemical and/or dynamical effects (i.e., a low CO abundance or close-in low-mass planets). The weak T Tauri stars show no CO fundamental emission down to low flux levels (5 × 10{sup −20} to 10{sup −18} W m{sup −2}). We illustrate how our results can be used to constrain the residual disk gas content in these systems and discuss their potential implications for star and planet formation.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C3C},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 836,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}