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Title: ROTATING STARS FROM KEPLER OBSERVED WITH GAIA DR1

Abstract

Astrometric data from the recent Gaia Data Release 1 have been matched against the sample of stars from Kepler with known rotation periods. A total of 1299 bright rotating stars were recovered from the subset of Gaia sources with good astrometric solutions, most with temperatures above 5000 K. From these sources, 894 were selected as lying near the main sequence using their absolute G -band magnitudes. These main-sequence stars show a bimodality in their rotation period distribution, centered roughly around a 600 Myr rotation isochrone. This feature matches the bimodal period distribution found in cooler stars with Kepler , but was previously undetected for solar-type stars due to sample contamination by subgiants. A tenuous connection between the rotation period and total proper motion is found, suggesting that the period bimodality is due to the age distribution of stars within ∼300 pc of the Sun, rather than a phase of rapid angular momentum loss. This work emphasizes the unique power for understanding stellar populations that is created by combining temporal monitoring from Kepler with astrometric data from Gaia .

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, 516 High Street, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663713
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANGULAR MOMENTUM; DISTRIBUTION; HEAT EXCHANGERS; LOSSES; PROPER MOTION; ROTATION; STARS; SUN

Citation Formats

Davenport, James R. A. ROTATING STARS FROM KEPLER OBSERVED WITH GAIA DR1. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/16.
Davenport, James R. A. ROTATING STARS FROM KEPLER OBSERVED WITH GAIA DR1. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/16.
Davenport, James R. A. Fri . "ROTATING STARS FROM KEPLER OBSERVED WITH GAIA DR1". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/16.
@article{osti_22663713,
title = {ROTATING STARS FROM KEPLER OBSERVED WITH GAIA DR1},
author = {Davenport, James R. A.},
abstractNote = {Astrometric data from the recent Gaia Data Release 1 have been matched against the sample of stars from Kepler with known rotation periods. A total of 1299 bright rotating stars were recovered from the subset of Gaia sources with good astrometric solutions, most with temperatures above 5000 K. From these sources, 894 were selected as lying near the main sequence using their absolute G -band magnitudes. These main-sequence stars show a bimodality in their rotation period distribution, centered roughly around a 600 Myr rotation isochrone. This feature matches the bimodal period distribution found in cooler stars with Kepler , but was previously undetected for solar-type stars due to sample contamination by subgiants. A tenuous connection between the rotation period and total proper motion is found, suggesting that the period bimodality is due to the age distribution of stars within ∼300 pc of the Sun, rather than a phase of rapid angular momentum loss. This work emphasizes the unique power for understanding stellar populations that is created by combining temporal monitoring from Kepler with astrometric data from Gaia .},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/16},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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