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Title: Occurrence of Radio Minihalos in a Mass-limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters

Abstract

We investigate the occurrence of radio minihalos—diffuse radio sources of unknown origin observed in the cores of some galaxy clusters—in a statistical sample of 58 clusters drawn from the Planck Sunyaev–Zel’dovich cluster catalog using a mass cut ( M {sub 500} > 6 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ⊙}). We supplement our statistical sample with a similarly sized nonstatistical sample mostly consisting of clusters in the ACCEPT X-ray catalog with suitable X-ray and radio data, which includes lower-mass clusters. Where necessary (for nine clusters), we reanalyzed the Very Large Array archival radio data to determine whether a minihalo is present. Our total sample includes all 28 currently known and recently discovered radio minihalos, including six candidates. We classify clusters as cool-core or non-cool-core according to the value of the specific entropy floor in the cluster center, rederived or newly derived from the Chandra X-ray density and temperature profiles where necessary (for 27 clusters). Contrary to the common wisdom that minihalos are rare, we find that almost all cool cores—at least 12 out of 15 (80%)—in our complete sample of massive clusters exhibit minihalos. The supplementary sample shows that the occurrence of minihalos may be lower in lower-mass cool-core clusters. Nomore » minihalos are found in non-cool cores or “warm cores.” These findings will help test theories of the origin of minihalos and provide information on the physical processes and energetics of the cluster cores.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]
  1. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)
  2. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
  3. INAF—Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663565
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 841; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CATALOGS; DENSITY; ENTROPY; GALAXY CLUSTERS; MASS; X RADIATION; X-RAY GALAXIES

Citation Formats

Giacintucci, Simona, Clarke, Tracy E., Markevitch, Maxim, Cassano, Rossella, Venturi, Tiziana, and Brunetti, Gianfranco, E-mail: simona.giacintucci@nrl.navy.mil. Occurrence of Radio Minihalos in a Mass-limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7069.
Giacintucci, Simona, Clarke, Tracy E., Markevitch, Maxim, Cassano, Rossella, Venturi, Tiziana, & Brunetti, Gianfranco, E-mail: simona.giacintucci@nrl.navy.mil. Occurrence of Radio Minihalos in a Mass-limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7069.
Giacintucci, Simona, Clarke, Tracy E., Markevitch, Maxim, Cassano, Rossella, Venturi, Tiziana, and Brunetti, Gianfranco, E-mail: simona.giacintucci@nrl.navy.mil. Thu . "Occurrence of Radio Minihalos in a Mass-limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7069.
@article{osti_22663565,
title = {Occurrence of Radio Minihalos in a Mass-limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters},
author = {Giacintucci, Simona and Clarke, Tracy E. and Markevitch, Maxim and Cassano, Rossella and Venturi, Tiziana and Brunetti, Gianfranco, E-mail: simona.giacintucci@nrl.navy.mil},
abstractNote = {We investigate the occurrence of radio minihalos—diffuse radio sources of unknown origin observed in the cores of some galaxy clusters—in a statistical sample of 58 clusters drawn from the Planck Sunyaev–Zel’dovich cluster catalog using a mass cut ( M {sub 500} > 6 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ⊙}). We supplement our statistical sample with a similarly sized nonstatistical sample mostly consisting of clusters in the ACCEPT X-ray catalog with suitable X-ray and radio data, which includes lower-mass clusters. Where necessary (for nine clusters), we reanalyzed the Very Large Array archival radio data to determine whether a minihalo is present. Our total sample includes all 28 currently known and recently discovered radio minihalos, including six candidates. We classify clusters as cool-core or non-cool-core according to the value of the specific entropy floor in the cluster center, rederived or newly derived from the Chandra X-ray density and temperature profiles where necessary (for 27 clusters). Contrary to the common wisdom that minihalos are rare, we find that almost all cool cores—at least 12 out of 15 (80%)—in our complete sample of massive clusters exhibit minihalos. The supplementary sample shows that the occurrence of minihalos may be lower in lower-mass cool-core clusters. No minihalos are found in non-cool cores or “warm cores.” These findings will help test theories of the origin of minihalos and provide information on the physical processes and energetics of the cluster cores.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA7069},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 841,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Some galaxy clusters show diffuse radio emission in the form of giant halos (GHs) on Mpc scales or minihalos (MHs) on smaller scales. Comparing Very Large Array and XMM-Newton radial profiles of several such clusters, we find a universal linear correlation between radio and X-ray surface brightness, valid in both types of halos. It implies a halo central emissivity {nu}j{sub {nu}} = 10{sup -31.4{+-}0.2}(n/10{sup -2}cm{sup -3}){sup 2}(T/T{sub 0}){sup 0.2{+-}0.5}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -3}, where T and T{sub 0} are the local and central temperatures, respectively, and n is the electron number density. We argue that the tight correlation and the scaling ofmore » j{sub {nu}}, combined with morphological and spectral evidence, indicate that both GHs and MHs arise from secondary electrons and positrons, produced in cosmic-ray ion (CRI) collisions with a strongly magnetized B {approx}> 3{mu}G intracluster gas. When the magnetic energy density drops below that of the microwave background, the radio emission weakens considerably, producing halos with a clumpy morphology (e.g., RXC J2003.5 - 2323 and A2255) or a distinct radial break. We thus measure a magnetic field B = 3{mu}G at a radius r {approx_equal} 110kpc in A2029 and r {approx_equal} 50kpc in Perseus. The spectrum of secondaries, produced from hadronic collisions of {approx}20GeV CRIs, reflects the energy dependence of the collision cross section. We use the observed spectra of halos, in particular where they steepen with increasing radius or frequency, to (1) measure B {approx_equal} 10({nu}/700MHz){mu}G with {nu} the spectral break frequency, (2) identify a correlation between the average spectrum and the central magnetic field, and (3) infer a CRI spectral index s {approx}< -2.7 and energy fraction {xi}{sub p} {approx} 10{sup -3.6{+-}0.2} at particle energies above 10 GeV. Our results favor a model where CRIs diffuse away from their sources (which are probably supernovae, according to a preliminary correlation with star formation), whereas the magnetic fields are generated by mergers in GHs and by core sloshing in MHs.« less
  • Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio 'minihalos'. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146, RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations. The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 10{sup 23-25} W Hz{sup –1} at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types ofmore » radio sources. Their sizes (40-160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck. We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.« less
  • We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg 2 of the XMM–Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥10 42 erg s -1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y_500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with anmore » extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17 ± 9)per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on these SZE mass–observable relations.« less
  • We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from similar to 6 deg(2) of the XMM-Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (>= 10(42) erg s(-1)) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y-500 mass relations. The former is inmore » good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8 sigma with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8 sigma significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y-500 signal that is (17 +/- 9) per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on these SZE mass-observable relations.« less