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Title: Particle Acceleration in Two Converging Shocks

Abstract

Observations by spacecraft such as ACE , STEREO , and others show that there are proton spectral “breaks” with energy E {sub br} at 1–10 MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. Generally, a single shock with the diffusive acceleration mechanism would not predict the “broken” energy spectrum. The present paper focuses on two converging shocks to identify this energy spectral feature. In this case, the converging shocks comprise one forward CME-driven shock on 2006 December 13 and another backward Earth bow shock. We simulate the detailed particle acceleration processes in the region of the converging shocks using the Monte Carlo method. As a result, we not only obtain an extended energy spectrum with an energy “tail” up to a few 10 MeV higher than that in previous single shock model, but also we find an energy spectral “break” occurring on ∼5.5 MeV. The predicted energy spectral shape is consistent with observations from multiple spacecraft. The spectral “break,” then, in this case is caused by the interaction between the CME shock and Earth’s bow shock, and otherwise would not be present if Earth were not in the path of the CME.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China)
  2. Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States)
  3. CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China)
  4. Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University) Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663495
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 842; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; ENERGY SPECTRA; INTERACTIONS; MASS; MEV RANGE; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PROTONS; SCATTERING; SHOCK WAVES; SPACE VEHICLES; SUN; TURBULENCE

Citation Formats

Wang, Xin, Wang, Na, Shan, Hao, Giacalone, Joe, Yan, Yihua, and Ding, Mingde, E-mail: wangxin@xao.ac.cn. Particle Acceleration in Two Converging Shocks. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA750F.
Wang, Xin, Wang, Na, Shan, Hao, Giacalone, Joe, Yan, Yihua, & Ding, Mingde, E-mail: wangxin@xao.ac.cn. Particle Acceleration in Two Converging Shocks. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA750F.
Wang, Xin, Wang, Na, Shan, Hao, Giacalone, Joe, Yan, Yihua, and Ding, Mingde, E-mail: wangxin@xao.ac.cn. Tue . "Particle Acceleration in Two Converging Shocks". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA750F.
@article{osti_22663495,
title = {Particle Acceleration in Two Converging Shocks},
author = {Wang, Xin and Wang, Na and Shan, Hao and Giacalone, Joe and Yan, Yihua and Ding, Mingde, E-mail: wangxin@xao.ac.cn},
abstractNote = {Observations by spacecraft such as ACE , STEREO , and others show that there are proton spectral “breaks” with energy E {sub br} at 1–10 MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. Generally, a single shock with the diffusive acceleration mechanism would not predict the “broken” energy spectrum. The present paper focuses on two converging shocks to identify this energy spectral feature. In this case, the converging shocks comprise one forward CME-driven shock on 2006 December 13 and another backward Earth bow shock. We simulate the detailed particle acceleration processes in the region of the converging shocks using the Monte Carlo method. As a result, we not only obtain an extended energy spectrum with an energy “tail” up to a few 10 MeV higher than that in previous single shock model, but also we find an energy spectral “break” occurring on ∼5.5 MeV. The predicted energy spectral shape is consistent with observations from multiple spacecraft. The spectral “break,” then, in this case is caused by the interaction between the CME shock and Earth’s bow shock, and otherwise would not be present if Earth were not in the path of the CME.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA750F},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 842,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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