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Title: Do You See What I See? Exploring the Consequences of Luminosity Limits in Black Hole–Galaxy Evolution Studies

Abstract

In studies of the connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and their host galaxies, there is widespread disagreement on some key aspects of the connection. These disagreements largely stem from a lack of understanding of the nature of the full underlying AGN population. Recent attempts to probe this connection utilize both observations and simulations to correct for a missed population, but presently are limited by intrinsic biases and complicated models. We take a simple simulation for galaxy evolution and add a new prescription for AGN activity to connect galaxy growth to dark matter halo properties and AGN activity to star formation. We explicitly model selection effects to produce an “observed” AGN population for comparison with observations and empirically motivated models of the local universe. This allows us to bypass the difficulties inherent in models that attempt to infer the AGN population by inverting selection effects. We investigate the impact of selecting AGNs based on thresholds in luminosity or Eddington ratio on the “observed” AGN population. By limiting our model AGN sample in luminosity, we are able to recreate the observed local AGN luminosity function and specific star formation-stellar mass distribution, and show that using an Eddington ratio threshold introduces lessmore » bias into the sample by selecting the full range of growing black holes, despite the challenge of selecting low-mass black holes. We find that selecting AGNs using these various thresholds yield samples with different AGN host galaxy properties.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)
  2. School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
  3. Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)
  4. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663410
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 843; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; GALACTIC EVOLUTION; GALAXY NUCLEI; LUMINOSITY; MASS; MASS DISTRIBUTION; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; SIMULATION; STARS; UNIVERSE; X RADIATION; X-RAY GALAXIES

Citation Formats

Jones, Mackenzie L., Hickox, Ryan C., DiPompeo, Michael A., Mutch, Simon J., Croton, Darren J., and Ptak, Andrew F. Do You See What I See? Exploring the Consequences of Luminosity Limits in Black Hole–Galaxy Evolution Studies. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7632.
Jones, Mackenzie L., Hickox, Ryan C., DiPompeo, Michael A., Mutch, Simon J., Croton, Darren J., & Ptak, Andrew F. Do You See What I See? Exploring the Consequences of Luminosity Limits in Black Hole–Galaxy Evolution Studies. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7632.
Jones, Mackenzie L., Hickox, Ryan C., DiPompeo, Michael A., Mutch, Simon J., Croton, Darren J., and Ptak, Andrew F. Mon . "Do You See What I See? Exploring the Consequences of Luminosity Limits in Black Hole–Galaxy Evolution Studies". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7632.
@article{osti_22663410,
title = {Do You See What I See? Exploring the Consequences of Luminosity Limits in Black Hole–Galaxy Evolution Studies},
author = {Jones, Mackenzie L. and Hickox, Ryan C. and DiPompeo, Michael A. and Mutch, Simon J. and Croton, Darren J. and Ptak, Andrew F.},
abstractNote = {In studies of the connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and their host galaxies, there is widespread disagreement on some key aspects of the connection. These disagreements largely stem from a lack of understanding of the nature of the full underlying AGN population. Recent attempts to probe this connection utilize both observations and simulations to correct for a missed population, but presently are limited by intrinsic biases and complicated models. We take a simple simulation for galaxy evolution and add a new prescription for AGN activity to connect galaxy growth to dark matter halo properties and AGN activity to star formation. We explicitly model selection effects to produce an “observed” AGN population for comparison with observations and empirically motivated models of the local universe. This allows us to bypass the difficulties inherent in models that attempt to infer the AGN population by inverting selection effects. We investigate the impact of selecting AGNs based on thresholds in luminosity or Eddington ratio on the “observed” AGN population. By limiting our model AGN sample in luminosity, we are able to recreate the observed local AGN luminosity function and specific star formation-stellar mass distribution, and show that using an Eddington ratio threshold introduces less bias into the sample by selecting the full range of growing black holes, despite the challenge of selecting low-mass black holes. We find that selecting AGNs using these various thresholds yield samples with different AGN host galaxy properties.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA7632},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 843,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}